William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''The worthiness of praise distains his worth
    If that the praised himself bring the praise forth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Aeneas, in Troilus and Cressida, act 1, sc. 3, l. 241-2. "Distains his worth" = taints or loses its value.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''But I will be
    A bridegroom in my death, and run into't
    As to a lover's bed.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 4, sc. 15, l. 99-101 (1623). Defeated and dishonored by Octavius Caesar, Antony longs to join Cleopatra, whom he believes to be dead, though he botches his act of suicide.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''What a fool Honesty is! and Trust, his sworn brother, a very simple gentleman!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Autolycus, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 4, l. 595-6. He finds it easy to cheat the honest shepherds.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''If a man do not erect in this age his own tomb ere he dies, he shall live no longer in monument than the bell rings and the widow weeps.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Benedick, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 5, sc. 2, l. 77-80.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''With meditating that she must die once,
    I have the patience to endure it now.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 191-2. On the death of his wife, Portia.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''You taught me language, and my profit on't
    Is, I know how to curse. The red plague rid you
    For learning me your language!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caliban, in The Tempest, act 1, sc. 2, l. 363-5. To Prospero; "red" refers to red sores caused by plague.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Those that she makes fair she scarce makes honest, and those that she makes honest she makes very ill-favoredly.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Celia, in As You Like It, act 1, sc. 2, l. 37-9. Discussing Fortune's contrary gifts to women with Rosalind.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''My salad days,
    When I was green in judgment, cold in blood,
    To say as I said then!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 1, sc. 5, l. 73-5. Dismissing her earlier love for Julius Caesar.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''This thorn
    Doth to our rose of youth rightly belong.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Countess of Rossillion, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 1, sc. 3, l. 129-30. The "thorn" is Helena's unrequited love.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Douglas. That's the worst tidings that I hear of yet.
    Worcester. Ay, by my faith, that bears a frosty sound.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Douglas and Worcester, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 4, sc. 1, l. 127-8. News that Glendower, one of the leading rebels, cannot muster his army for fourteen days.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

[Report Error]