William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Well, if Fortune be a woman, she's a good wench for this gear.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Launcelot Gobbo, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 2, l. 166-7. Fortune was depicted as a goddess; "gear" means business; Launcelot has the good fortune to be taken on as a servant by Bassanio.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Let me not to the marriage of true minds
    Admit impediments. Love is not love
    Which alters when it alteration finds,
    Or bends with the remover to remove.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Let me not to the marriage of true minds (l. 1-4). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Is this a dagger which I see before me,
    The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee.
    I have thee not, and yet I see thee still.
    Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible
    To feeling as to sight? Or art thou but
    A dagger of the mind, a false creation
    Proceeding from the heat-oppressèd brain?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 2, sc. 1, l. 33-39 (1623). Soliloquy preceding the murder of Duncan.
  • ''He hath borne himself beyond the promise of his age, doing, in the figure of a lamb, the feats of a lion.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Messenger, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 1, sc. 1, l. 13-5. On the feats of young Claudio in battle.
  • ''Would any but these boiled-brains of nineteen and two-and-twenty hunt this weather?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Old Shepherd, in The Winter's Tale, act 3, sc. 3, l. 63-5. That is, in the gloom of a great storm.
  • ''Here is my journey's end, here is my butt
    And very sea-mark of my utmost sail.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 5, sc. 2, l. 267-8. "Butt" means goal; a sea-mark was a beacon or landmark to guide ships to harbor.
  • ''Nothing but sit and sit, and eat and eat!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Petruchio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 5, sc. 2, l. 12. At Lucentio's banquet to celebrate his marriage.
  • ''O, these naughty times
    Puts bars between the owners and their rights!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 2, l. 18-9. "Naughty" means wicked; "bars" means barriers; she is regretting that she cannot choose a husband for herself.
  • ''Knowing I loved my books, he furnished me
    From mine own library with volumes that
    I prize above my dukedom.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prospero, in The Tempest, act 1, sc. 2, l. 166-8. On the loyal Gonzalo, who provided him with books in his exile.
  • ''Your words and performances are no kin together.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Roderigo, in Othello, act 4, sc. 2, l. 182-3. On the gap between what Iago promises and what he does.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

[Report Error]