William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Freedom, high-day! high-day, freedom! freedom, high-day, freedom!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caliban, in The Tempest, act 2, sc. 2, l. 186-7. Caliban is only exchanging one kind of servitude, under Prospero, for another, under Stephano and Trinculo.
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  • ''O, that's a brave man! he writes brave verses, speaks
    brave words, swears brave oaths, and breaks them bravely.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Celia, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 4, l. 40-2. Mocking Orlando; "brave" means "fine," used ironically.
  • ''That I might sleep out this great gap of time
    My Antony is away.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 1, sc. 5, l. 5.
  • ''In her days every man shall eat in safety
    Under his own vine what he plants, and sing
    The merry songs of peace to all his neighbors.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cranmer, in Henry VIII, act 5, sc. 4, l. 33-5. Anticipating the reign of Queen Elizabeth I; the terms recall biblical passages such as Micah 4:3-4.
  • ''Thou are the king of honor.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Douglas, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 4, sc. 1, l. 10. To Hotspur, who has gained honor or fame on the battlefield.
  • ''He will to his Egyptian dish again.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Enobarbus, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 2, sc. 7, l. 126. Foreseeing that Antony, though married and in Rome, will not stay away from Cleopatra.
  • ''A man can die but once, we owe God a death.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Feeble, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 3, sc. 2, l. 234-5. Proverbial; Feeble shows his courage.
  • ''More matter with less art.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gertrude, in Hamlet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 95. To Polonius, who claims to know the cause of Hamlet's madness but is being long-winded in coming to the point; "art" means rhetorical decoration.
  • ''Remember thee?
    Ay, thou poor ghost, whiles memory holds a seat
    In this distracted globe. Remember thee?
    Yea, from the table of my memory
    I'll wipe away all trivial fond records,
    All saws of books, all forms, all pressures past
    That youth and observation copied there,
    And thy commandment all alone shall live
    Within the book and volume of my brain,''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Hamlet (I, v). NAWM-1. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Rebellious hell,
    If thou canst mutine in a matron's bones,
    To flaming youth let virtue be as wax
    And melt in her own fire.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 4, l. 82-5. Reproaching his mother for marrying her late husband's brother, a marriage Hamlet regards as springing from lust.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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