William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Naked in bed, Iago, and not mean harm?
    It is hypocrisy against the devil.
    They that mean virtuously and yet do so,
    The devil their virtue tempts, and they tempt heaven.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 4, sc. 1, l. 5-8. Imagining Cassio in bed with Desdemona; as good covering up evil is hypocrisy against God, so evil actions that claim to be virtuous constitute hypocrisy against the devil.
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  • '''Twixt such friends as we
    Few words suffice.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Petruchio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 1, sc. 2, l. 65-6. To his good friend Hortensio.
  • ''I never did repent for doing good,
    Nor shall not now.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 4, l. 10-1. On setting off to help Antonio.
  • ''This thing of darkness I
    Acknowledge mine.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prospero, in The Tempest, act 5, sc. 1, l. 275-6. Owning that he is responsible for Caliban.
  • ''These violent delights have violent ends
    And in their triumph die, like fire and powder,
    Which as they kiss consume.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Romeo and Juliet (II, vi). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Berowne they call him, but a merrier man,
    Within the limit of becoming mirth,
    I never spent an hour's talk withal.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosaline, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 2, sc. 1, l. 66-8. Rosaline's account of meeting with Berowne.
  • ''A plague o' these pickle herring!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sir Toby Belch, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 5, l. 120-1. Excusing a drunken belch.
  • ''Thy husband is thy lord, thy life, thy keeper,
    Thy head, thy sovereign; one that cares for thee,
    And for thy maintenance commits his body
    To painful labor both by sea and land,
    To watch the night in storms, the day in cold,
    Whilst thou liest warm at home, secure and safe;
    And craves no other tribute at thy hands
    But love, fair looks, and true obedience—
    Too little payment for so great a debt.
    Such duty as the subject owes the prince,
    Even such a woman oweth to her husband;
    And when she is froward, peevish, sullen, sour,
    And not obedient to his honest will,
    What is she but a foul contending rebel
    And graceless traitor to her loving lord?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. The Taming of the Shrew (V, ii). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''But something may be done that we will not,
    And sometimes we are devils to ourselves,
    When we will tempt the frailty of our powers,
    Presuming on their changeful potency.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Troilus, in Troilus and Cressida, act 4, sc. 4, l. 94-7. Anxious about Cressida's promise to be faithful to him; "changeful potency" = unstable strength.
  • ''Light boats sail swift, though greater hulks draw deep.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Agamemnon, in Troilus and Cressida, act 2, sc. 3, l. 265-6. "Hulks" = large and clumsier vessels.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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