William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''The evil that men do lives after them;
    The good is oft interred with their bones.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Julius Caesar (III, ii). NAWM-1. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''Thus may we gather honey from the weed
    And make a moral of the devil himself.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 4, sc. 1, l. 11-2. Drawing encouragement from adversity.
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  • ''Go bind thou up young dangling apricots
    Which, like unruly children, make their sire
    Stoop with oppression of their prodigal weight.
    Give some supportance to the bending twigs.
    Go thou, and like an executioner
    Cut off the heads of too-fast-growing sprays
    That look too lofty in our commonwealth.
    All must be even in our government.
    You thus employed, I will go root away
    The noisome weeds which without profit suck
    The soil's fertility from wholesome flowers.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. King Richard II (III, iv). Giving instructions to his assistant; "prodigal" means excessive. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''The old proverb is very well parted between my master Shylock and you, sir: you have the grace of God, sir, and he hath enough.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Launcelot Gobbo, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 2, l. 149-51. The proverb is "the grace of God is great enough"; Launcelot means that his father has grace, and Shylock enough in the sense of wealth.
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  • ''Time doth transfix the flourish set on youth
    And delves the parallels in beauty's brow,
    Feeds on the rarities of nature's truth,
    And nothing stands but for his scythe to mow:
    And yet to times in hope my verse shall stand,
    Praising thy worth, despite his cruel hand.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore (l. 9-14). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''I have bought
    Golden opinions from all sorts of people.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 7.
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  • ''It shall be said his judgment ruled our hands.
    Our youths and wildness shall no whit appear,
    But all be buried in his gravity.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Metellus, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 1, l. 147-9. Arguing for the inclusion of Cicero as one of the conspirators.
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  • ''He says he loves my daughter:
    I think so too; for never gaz'd the moon
    Upon the water as he'll stand and read
    As 'twere my daughter's eyes: and, to be plain,
    I think there is not half a kiss to choose
    Who loves another best.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Old Shepherd, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 4, l. 171-6. On Perdita and Florizel.
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  • ''Put out the light, and then put out the light.
    If I quench thee, thou flaming minister,
    I can again thy former light restore
    Should I repent me; but once put out thy light,
    Thou cunning'st pattern of excelling nature,
    I know not where is that Promethean heat
    That can thy light relume.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 5, sc. 2, l. 7-13. The "light" is both that of the candle ("flaming minister") he carries and that of Desdemona; Prometheus in Greek legend stole fire from the gods to give it to human beings; "relume" means light again.
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  • ''Thou flea, thou nit, thou winter-cricket thou.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Petruchio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 4, sc. 3, l. 109. An example of Petruchio's insults, here directed at a tailor; a "nit" is the egg of a louse.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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