William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Myself, and what is mine, to you and yours
    Is now converted.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 2, l. 166-7. Giving herself to Bassanio in love.
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  • ''Midnight mushrooms.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prospero, in The Tempest, act 5, sc. 1, l. 39. "Mushrumps" in the original text, imagined as brought into being by Prospero's spirits.
  • ''How oft when men are at the point of death
    Have they been merry! which their keepers call
    A lightning before death: O, how may I
    Call this a lightning? O my love! my wife!
    Death, that hath sucked the honey of thy breath,
    Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty:
    Thou art not conquered; beauty's ensign yet
    Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
    And death's pale flag is not advanced there.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Romeo and Juliet (V, iii). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''His eye begets occasion for his wit,
    For every object that the one doth catch
    The other turns to a mirth-moving jest.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosaline, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 2, sc. 1, l. 69-71. Describing Berowne.
  • ''If there be no great love in the beginning, yet heaven may decrease it upon better acquaintance, when we are married and have more occasion to know one another.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Slender, in The Merry Wives of Windsor, act 1, sc. 1, l. 246-9. Responding to the suggestion that he marry Anne Page.
  • ''This island's mine, by Sycorax my mother,
    Which thou tak'st from me. When thou cam'st first,
    Thou strok'st me and made much of me, wouldst give me
    Water with berries in 't, and teach me how
    To name the bigger light, and how the less,
    That burn by day and night. And then I loved thee
    And showed thee all the qualities o' th' isle,
    The fresh springs, brine pits, barren place and fertile.
    Cursed be I that did so! All the charms
    Of Sycorax, toads, beetles, bats, light on you!
    For I am all the subjects that you have,
    Which first was mine own king; and here you sty me
    In this hard rock, whiles you do keep from me
    The rest o' the' island.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. The Tempest (I, ii). OAEL-1. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Is she worth keeping? Why, she is a pearl
    Whose price hath launched above a thousand ships.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Troilus, in Troilus and Cressida, act 2, sc. 2, l. 81-2. Referring to Helen, whose rape by Paris caused the Trojan war, and echoing a famous passage in Christopher Marlowe's play, Doctor Faustus.
  • ''A stirring dwarf we do allowance give
    Before a sleeping giant.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Agamemnon, in Troilus and Cressida, act 2, sc. 3, l. 137-8. Achilles is the "sleeping giant," who refuses to fight; "allowance" = praise, honor.
  • ''Fie, wrangling queen!
    Whom every thing becomes—to chide, to laugh,
    To weep.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 1, sc. 1, l. 48-50. Cleopatra's "infinite variety" (act 2, sc. 2, l. 235).
  • ''I see this is the time that the unjust man doth thrive.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Autolycus, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 4, l. 673-4. He has benefited by an exchange of clothes with Prince Florizel.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxxvii

Thy glass will show thee how thy beauties wear,
Thy dial how thy precious minutes waste;
The vacant leaves thy mind's imprint will bear,
And of this book this learning mayst thou taste.
The wrinkles which thy glass will truly show
Of mouthed graves will give thee memory;
Thou by thy dial's shady stealth mayst know
Time's thievish progress to eternity.
Look, what thy memory can not contain

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