William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Grim-visaged War hath smoothed his wrinkled front;
    And now, instead of mounting barbed steeds
    To fright the souls of fearful adversaries,
    He capers nimbly in a lady's chamber
    To the lascivious pleasing of a lute.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. King Richard III (I, i). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''He must needs go that the devil drives.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lavatch, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 1, sc. 3, l. 29-30. Proverbial.
  • ''Is this the nature
    Whom passion could not shake? whose solid virtue
    The shot of accident nor dart of chance
    Could neither graze nor pierce?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lodovico, in Othello, act 4, sc. 1, l. 265-8. Amazed at the angry passion Othello shows.
  • ''Why should I play the Roman fool and die
    On my own sword?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 5, sc. 8, l. 1-2. Suicide was advocated by the Roman Stoics, notably Seneca.
  • ''Mine eye and heart are at a mortal war,
    How to divide the conquest of thy sight;
    Mine eye my heart thy picture's sight would bar,
    My heart mine eye the freedom of that right.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Mine eye and heart are at a mortal war (l. 1-4). InvP. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Under an old oak, whose boughs were mossed with age
    And high top bald with dry antiquity.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Oliver, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 3, l. 104-5.
  • ''If it were now to die,
    'Twere now to be most happy; for I fear
    My soul hath her content so absolute
    That not another comfort like to this
    Succeeds in unknown fate.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 2, sc. 1, l. 189-93. This ironically does turn out to be Othello's happiest moment.
  • ''Phebe. Thou hast my love; is not that neighborly?
    Silvius. I would have you.
    Phebe. Why, that were covetousness.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Phebe and Silvius, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 5, l. 90-1. "Thou shalt not covet ... any thing that is thy neighbor's" is God's commandment, Exodus 20.17.
  • ''There's no motion
    That tends to vice in man, but I affirm
    It is the woman's part.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Posthumus, in Cymbeline, act 2, sc. 5, l. 20-2. Posthumus turns against all women, falsely believing Imogen to be unfaithful; "motion" means impulse.
  • ''I find my zenith doth depend upon
    A most auspicious star, whose influence
    If now I court not, but omit, my fortunes
    Will ever after droop.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prospero, in The Tempest, act 1, sc. 2, l. 181-4. "Zenith" means height of fortune.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

[Report Error]