William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''The gray-eyed morn smiles on the frowning night,
    Check'ring the eastern clouds with streaks of light,
    And fleckled darkness like a drunkard reels
    From forth day's path and Titan's fiery wheels.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Romeo and Juliet (II, iii). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''They say an old man is twice a child.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosencrantz, in Hamlet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 385. To Hamlet, who has just pointed out Polonius; proverbial.
  • ''Come, madam wife, sit by my side
    And let the world slip. We shall ne'er be younger.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sly, in The Taming of the Shrew, Induction, sc. 2, l. 142-4. Inviting her to forget the world and watch a play.
  • ''Earth's increase, foison plenty,
    Barns and garners never empty,
    Vines with clustering bunches growing,
    Plants with goodly burden bowing;

    Spring come to you at the farthest
    In the very end of harvest!
    Scarcity and want shall shun you;
    Ceres' blessing so is on you.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. The Tempest (IV, i). Ceres, goddess of fertility, offers her blessing to Ferdinand and Miranda. OAEL-1. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''O Cressida! But that the busy day,
    Waked by the lark, hath roused the ribald crows,
    And dreaming night will hide our joys no longer,
    I would not from thee.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Troilus, in Troilus and Cressida, act 4, sc. 2, l. 8-11. The morning after their first night together.
  • ''Much attribute he hath, and much the reason
    Why we ascribe it to him; yet all his virtues,
    Not virtuously of his own part beheld,
    Do in our eyes begin to lose their gloss,
    Yea, like fair fruit in an unwholesome dish,
    Are like to rot untasted.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Agamemnon, in Troilus and Cressida, act 2, sc. 3, l. 116-21. Commenting on the scornful behavior of Achilles; "attribute" = distinction, fame.
  • ''There is left us
    Ourselves to end ourselves.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 4, sc. 14, l. 21-2. His despairing last resort.
  • ''Though I am not naturally honest, I am so sometimes by chance.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Autolycus, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 4.
  • ''Who set this ancient quarrel new abroach?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Benvolio, in Romeo and Juliet, act 1, sc. 1, l. 118-9. "Abroach" means flowing, as in opening or broaching a cask.
  • ''O, if thou wert the noblest of thy strain,
    Young man, thou couldst not die more honorable.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 5, sc. 1, l. 59-60. That is, if he were to die on the sword of Brutus.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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