poet William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare

#2 on top 500 poets

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''The gray-eyed morn smiles on the frowning night,
    Check'ring the eastern clouds with streaks of light,
    And fleckled darkness like a drunkard reels
    From forth day's path and Titan's fiery wheels.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Romeo and Juliet (II, iii). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''They say an old man is twice a child.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosencrantz, in Hamlet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 385. To Hamlet, who has just pointed out Polonius; proverbial.
    2 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Come, madam wife, sit by my side
    And let the world slip. We shall ne'er be younger.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sly, in The Taming of the Shrew, Induction, sc. 2, l. 142-4. Inviting her to forget the world and watch a play.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Earth's increase, foison plenty,
    Barns and garners never empty,
    Vines with clustering bunches growing,
    Plants with goodly burden bowing;

    Spring come to you at the farthest
    In the very end of harvest!
    Scarcity and want shall shun you;
    Ceres' blessing so is on you.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. The Tempest (IV, i). Ceres, goddess of fertility, offers her blessing to Ferdinand and Miranda. OAEL-1. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''O Cressida! But that the busy day,
    Waked by the lark, hath roused the ribald crows,
    And dreaming night will hide our joys no longer,
    I would not from thee.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Troilus, in Troilus and Cressida, act 4, sc. 2, l. 8-11. The morning after their first night together.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Much attribute he hath, and much the reason
    Why we ascribe it to him; yet all his virtues,
    Not virtuously of his own part beheld,
    Do in our eyes begin to lose their gloss,
    Yea, like fair fruit in an unwholesome dish,
    Are like to rot untasted.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Agamemnon, in Troilus and Cressida, act 2, sc. 3, l. 116-21. Commenting on the scornful behavior of Achilles; "attribute" = distinction, fame.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''There is left us
    Ourselves to end ourselves.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 4, sc. 14, l. 21-2. His despairing last resort.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Though I am not naturally honest, I am so sometimes by chance.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Autolycus, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 4.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Who set this ancient quarrel new abroach?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Benvolio, in Romeo and Juliet, act 1, sc. 1, l. 118-9. "Abroach" means flowing, as in opening or broaching a cask.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''O, if thou wert the noblest of thy strain,
    Young man, thou couldst not die more honorable.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 5, sc. 1, l. 59-60. That is, if he were to die on the sword of Brutus.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case