poet William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare

#2 on top 500 poets

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Never was monarch better feared and loved
    Than is your Majesty.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cambridge, in Henry V, act 2, sc. 2, l. 25-6.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Now boast thee, death, in thy possession lies
    A lass unparalleled.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Charmian, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 5, sc. 2, l. 315-6. The "lass" is Cleopatra, Queen of Egypt.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Show me, my women, like a queen; go fetch
    My best attires. I am again for Cydnus
    To meet Mark Antony.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 5, sc. 2, l. 227-9. Dressing up to recapture her first glamorous meeting with Antony.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''To fear the worst oft cures the worse.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cressida, in Troilus and Cressida, act 3, sc. 2. Her answer to Troilus' remark, "Fears make cherubim of angels; they never see truly." She maintains that "Blind fear, that seeing reason leads, finds safer footing than blind reason, stumbling without fear."
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Art thou gone too? All comfort go with thee,
    For none abides with me.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duchess of Gloucester, in Henry VI, Part 2, act 2, sc. 4, l. 87-8. On being forced to part from her husband.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Escalus, in Measure for Measure, act 2, sc. 1, l. 38. Thinking of the generally virtuous Claudio, sentenced to death by Angelo.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Where should this music be? I' th' air, or th' earth?
    It sounds no more.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ferdinand, in The Tempest, act 1, sc. 2, l. 388-9. On hearing Ariel's spirit music.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''But this eternal blazon must not be
    To ears of flesh and blood.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ghost, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 5, l. 21-2. Refusing to describe to Hamlet his afterlife; "eternal blazon" means revelation of eternal things.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Hamlet. What, looked he frowningly?
    Horatio. A countenance more
    In sorrow than in anger.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet and Horatio, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 2, l. 231-2. Describing the expression of the ghost of Hamlet's father.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Now get you to my lady's chamber, and tell her, let her paint
    an inch thick, to this favor she must come; make her laugh at
    that.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 5, sc. 1, l. 192-5. Addressing the skull of Yorick, the king's jester.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?