William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Why, what a candy deal of courtesy
    This fawning greyhound then did proffer me!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hotspur, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 1, sc. 3, l. 251-2. Henry IV once needed the help of Hotspur to regain his rights; "candy deal" means sugary quantity.
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  • ''Authority, though it err like others,
    Hath yet a kind of medicine in itself,
    That skins the vice o' the top.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Isabella, in Measure for Measure, act 2, sc. 2, l. 134-6. Reminding Angelo that men may use authority to cover ("skin") their vices without remedying them.
  • ''Death, as the Psalmist saith, is certain to all, all shall
    die.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Justice Shallow, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 3, sc. 2, l. 37-8. Psalm 89:48.
  • ''The man that once did sell the lion's skin
    While the beast lived, was killed with hunting him.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 4, sc. 3, l. 93-4. Referring to the French, who rashly expect an easy victory.
  • ''O Lord, methought what pain it was to drown!
    What dreadful noise of waters in my ears!
    What sights of ugly death within my eyes!
    Methought I saw a thousand fearful wracks;
    Ten thousand men that fishes gnawed upon;
    Wedges of gold, great anchors, heaps of pearl,
    Inestimable stones, unvalued jewels,
    All scattered in the bottom of the sea.
    Some lay in dead men's skulls, and in the holes
    Where eyes did once inhabit there were crept,
    As 'twere in scorn of eyes, reflecting gems,
    That wooed the slimy bottom of the deep
    And mocked the dead bones that lay scattered by.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. King Richard III (I, iv). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Barnes are blessings.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lavatch, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 1, sc. 3, l. 25-6. "Barnes" means bairns, or children.
  • ''When we mean to build,
    We first survey the plot, then draw the model,
    And when we see the figure of the house,
    Then must we rate the cost of the erection,
    Which if we find outweighs ability,
    What do we then but draw anew the model
    In fewer offices, or at least desist
    To build at all?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lord Bardolph, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 1, sc. 2, l. 41-8. On confining plans within the scope available resources; "offices" means rooms.
  • ''Ere the bat hath flown
    His cloistered flight, ere to black Hecate's summons
    The shard-born beetle with his drowsy hums
    Hath rung night's yawning peal, there shall be done
    A deed of dreadful note.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 3, sc. 2, l. 40-4. Bats and dung-beetles ("shard-borne") were associated with darkness, and here with Hecate, goddess of witchcraft.
  • ''Mine eye's due is thine outward part,
    And my heart's right thine inward love of heart.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Mine eye and heart are at a mortal war (l. 13-14). EyDe. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Kindness, nobler ever than revenge.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Oliver, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 1, l. 128. Speaking of Orlando's resolve to rescue his brother from danger.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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