William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Where souls do couch on flowers, we'll hand in hand,
    And with our sprightly port make the ghosts gaze.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 4, sc. 14, l. 52-3. Imagining a blissful afterlife united with Cleopatra.
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  • ''When daffodils begin to peer,
    With heigh, the doxy over the dale,
    Why then comes in the sweet o'the year,
    For the red blood reigns in the winter's pale.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Autolycus, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 3, l. 1-4. The rogue Autolycus bursts in to change the mood from winter to spring, singing of renewed vitality ("red blood") doing away with the paleness of winter; a "doxy" is slang for a wench or, in modern slang, a floozy.
  • ''Bernardo. It was about to speak when the cock crew.
    Horatio. And then it started like a guilty thing
    Upon a fearful summons.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bernardo and Horatio, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 1, l. 147-9. Describing the ghost of Hamlet's father; "fearful" means terrifying.
  • ''How ill this taper burns! Ha! Who comes here?
    I think it is the weakness of mine eyes
    That shapes this monstrous apparition.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 275-7. On the entry of the ghost of Caesar.
  • ''Camillo. Prosperity's the very bond of love,
    Whose fresh complexion and whose heart together
    Affliction alters.
    Perdita. One of these is true:
    I think affliction may subdue the cheek,
    But not take in the mind.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Camillo and Perdita, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 4, l. 573-7. Camillo is trying to help Perdita escape from the anger of Polixenes.
  • ''Downy windows, close,
    And golden Phoebus never be beheld
    Of eyes again so royal!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Charmian, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 5, sc. 2, l. 316-8. Closing Cleopatra's eyes after her death.
  • ''No more but e'en a woman, and commanded
    By such poor passion as the maid that milks
    And does the meanest chares.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 4, sc. 15, l. 73-5. In grief the Queen discovers her common humanity.
  • ''Ah, poor our sex! This fault in us I find,
    The error of our eye directs our mind.
    What error leads must err; O then conclude,
    Minds swayed by eyes are full of turpitude.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cressida, in Troilus and Cressida, act 5, sc. 2, l. 109-12. One abandoning Troilus for Diomedes.
  • ''That which in mean men we entitle patience
    Is pale cold cowardice in noble breasts.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duchess of Gloucester, in Richard II, act 1, sc. 2, l. 33-4. Accusing John of Gaunt of cowardice for taking no action about the murder of his brother.
  • ''I will make an end of my dinner; there's pippins and cheese to come.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Evans, in The Merry Wives of Windsor, act 1, sc. 2, l. 11-13. Apples and cheese round off the meal.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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