William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''In an early spring
    We see th'appearing buds, which to prove fruit
    Hope gives not so much warrant, as despair
    That frosts will bite them.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lord Bardolph, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 1, sc. 3, l. 38-41. Fear of a killing frost tends to outweigh hope for a plentiful crop.
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  • ''We have scorched the snake, not killed it:
    She'll close and be herself.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 3, sc. 2, l. 13-4. "Scorched" means slashed, scored; "close" means heal up.
  • ''Mine eye hath play'd the painter, and hath steel'd
    Thy beauty's form in table of my heart:''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Mine eye hath play'd the painter (l. 1-2). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''A lioness, with udders all drawn dry,
    Lay couching, head on ground, with cat-like watch
    When that the sleeping man should stir; for 'tis
    The royal disposition of that beast
    To prey on nothing that doth seem as dead.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Oliver, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 3, l. 114-8. Describing the danger from which Orlando rescued him.
  • ''Most potent, grave, and reverend signiors,
    My very noble and approved good masters.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 1, sc. 3, l. 76-7. Addressing the Senate of Venice; "potent" means powerful; "approved" means tested by experience.
  • ''He'll make a proper man.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Phebe, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 5, l. 115. Fondly describing Rosalind, in disguise as a young man.
  • ''Hang there like fruit, my soul,
    Till the tree die!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Posthumus, in Cymbeline, act 5, sc. 5, l. 263-4. Embracing Imogen, as all deceptions and mistakes in the story are revealed.
  • ''Graves at my command
    Have waked their sleepers, oped, and let 'em forth
    By my so potent art. But this rough magic
    I here abjure.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prospero, in The Tempest, act 5, sc. 1, l. 48-51. Renouncing his magical powers; "oped" means opened.
  • ''Let me have
    A dram of poison, such soon-speeding gear
    As will disperse itself through all the veins
    That the life-weary taker may fall dead,
    And that the trunk may be discharged of breath
    As violently as hasty powder fired
    Doth hurry from the fatal cannon's womb.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Romeo and Juliet (V, i). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Your son, my lord, has paid a soldier's debt.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ross, in Macbeth, act 5, sc. 9, l. 5. On Young Siward, killed in battle.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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