William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''He was disposed to mirth, but on the sudden
    A Roman thought hath struck him.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 1, sc. 2, l. 82-3. Antony occasionally remembers his duties as a ruler, and his wife in Rome.
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  • ''My thoughts were like unbridled children, grown
    Too headstrong for their mother.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cressida, in Troilus and Cressida, act 3, sc. 2, l. 122-3. Admitting her love for Troilus.
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  • ''Sorrow ends not when it seemeth done.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duchess of Gloucester, in Richard II, act 1, sc. 2, l. 61. Lamenting her murdered husband.
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  • ''For government, though high, and low, and lower,
    Put into parts, doth keep in one consent,
    Congreeing in a full and natural close,
    Like music.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Exeter, in Henry V, act 1, sc. 2, l. 180-3. Though divided among social groups, and into various functions ("parts"), the aspects of government agree together ("congreeing") in a final harmony ("close"); "parts" means quibbles on the parts in a musical score.
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  • ''These sweet thoughts do even refresh my labors.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ferdinand, in The Tempest, act 3, sc. 1, l. 14. Thoughts, that is, of Miranda, with whom he is in love.
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  • ''But virtue, as it never will be moved,
    Though lewdness court it in a shape of heaven,
    So lust, though to a radiant angel linked,
    Will sate itself in a celestial bed
    And prey on garbage.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ghost, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 5, l. 53-7. Accusing his widow Gertrude of lust in marrying a brother he despises, a marriage he regards as incestuous; "shape of heaven" means angelic form; "sate itself" means gratify its appetite to the point of disgust.
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  • ''Hamlet. Methinks I see my father.
    Horatio. Where, my lord?
    Hamlet. In my mind's eye, Horatio.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet and Horatio, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 2, l. 184-5. Recalling the appearance of the ghost of old Hamlet in the previous scene.
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  • ''Report me and my cause aright.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 5, sc. 2.
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  • ''They come like sacrifices in their trim,
    And to the fire-eyed maid of smoky war
    All hot and bleeding will we offer them.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hotspur, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 4, sc. 1, l. 113-5. Expecting to defeat Prince Hal and his army; "fire-eyed maid" means Bellona, goddess of war.
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  • ''O, it is excellent
    To have a giant's strength, but it is tyrannous
    To use it like a giant.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Isabella, in Measure for Measure, act 2, sc. 2.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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