William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''And we shall be merry, now comes in the sweet o' the night.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Justice Shallow, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 5, sc. 3, l. 50-1. As they break out the wine.
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  • ''Gloucester, 'tis true that we are in great danger;
    The greater therefore should our courage be.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 4, sc. 1, l. 1-2. Preparing to fight the French army.
  • ''I am a villain. Yet I lie, I am not.
    Fool, of thyself speak well. Fool, do not flatter.
    My conscience hath a thousand several tongues,
    And every tongue brings in a several tale,
    And every tale condemns me for a villain.
    Perjury, perjury, in the highest degree,
    Murder, stern murder, in the direst degree,
    All several sins, all used in each degree,
    Throng to the bar, crying all, "Guilty! Guilty!"
    I shall despair. There is no creature loves me,
    And if I die no soul will pity me.
    And wherefore should they, since that I myself
    Find in myself no pity to myself?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. King Richard III (V, iii). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Lear. Who is it that can tell me who I am?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear and Fool, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 4, l. 230-1.
  • ''Beauty and honor in her are so mingled
    That they have caught the king.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lord Chamberlain, in Henry VIII, act 2, sc. 3, l. 76-7. On Anne Bullen, soon to be queen.
  • ''I dare do all that may become a man;
    Who dares do more is none.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 7, l. 46-7. "Become" means be proper to, or grace, and could be meant in physical or moral terms.
  • ''For through the painter must you see his skill,
    To find where your true image pictured lies,
    Which in my bosom's shop is hanging still,''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Mine eye hath play'd the painter (l. 5-7). EyDe. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Pacing through the forest,
    Chewing the food of sweet and bitter fancy.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Oliver, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 3, l. 100-1. On Orlando mulling over his thoughts of love.
  • ''Speak of me as I am. Nothing extenuate,
    Nor set down aught in malice.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 5, sc. 2. Making an appeal to his arresting officers.
  • ''Eyes, that are the frail'st and softest things,
    Who shut their coward gates on atomies.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Phebe, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 5, l. 12-3. "Atomies" are atoms or motes.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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