William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''The power that I have on you is to spare you;
    The malice towards you, to forgive you. Live,
    And deal with others better.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Posthumus, in Cymbeline, act 5, sc. 5, l. 418-20. To Jachimo, after Jachimo's explanation of he way he deceived Posthumus.
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  • ''Write till your ink be dry, and with your tears
    Moist it again, and frame some feeling line
    That may discover such integrity.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Proteus, in The Two Gentlemen of Verona, act 3, sc. 2. Giving advice to Thurio.
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  • ''But come what sorrow can,
    It cannot countervail the exchange of joy
    That one short minute gives me in her sight.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Romeo and Juliet (II, vi). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''Thriftless ambition, that will raven up
    Thine own life's means!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ross, in Macbeth, act 2, sc. 4, l. 28-9. Supposing Duncan's sons have killed their father, and hence their means of subsistence; "raven up" means devour greedily.
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  • ''Let us say you are sad
    Because you are not merry; and 'twere as easy
    For you to laugh and leap, and say you are merry
    Because you are not sad.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Solanio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 1, sc. 1, l. 47-50. On Antonio's unexplained melancholy.
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  • ''Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
    As I foretold you, were all spirits, and
    Are melted into air, into thin air.
    And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,
    The cloud-capped towers, the gorgeous palaces,
    The solemn temples, the great globe itself—
    Yea, all which it inherit—shall dissolve
    And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
    Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
    As dreams are made on, and our little life
    Is rounded with a sleep.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. The Tempest (IV, i). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''This is the monstruosity in love, lady—that the will is infinite and the execution confined; that the desire is boundless and the act a slave to limit.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Troilus, in Troilus and Cressida, act 3, sc. 2, l. 77-80 (1609). Troilus, in Troilus and Cressida, on the discrepancy between lovers' aspirations and their realization, shortly before the first sexual encounter between himself and Cressida.
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  • ''I do hate a proud man as I hate the engendering of toads.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ajax, in Troilus and Cressida, act 2, sc. 3, l. 158-9. Nestor wisely comments, "And yet he loves himself."
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  • ''I will reward thee
    Once for thy sprightly comfort, and tenfold
    For thy good valor.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 4, sc. 7, l. 14-6. The "comfort" is news of victory.
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  • ''There's not a note of mine that's worth the noting.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Balthasar, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 3, l. 55. Quibbling on "noting" and "nothing," as the play portrays much ado about noting (observing or listening) and a quarrel that springs from nothing.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

A Fairy Song

Over hill, over dale,
Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire!
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moon's sphere;
And I serve the Fairy Queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green;
The cowslips tall her pensioners be;
In their gold coats spots you see;
Those be rubies, fairy favours;
In those freckles live their savours;
I must go seek some dewdrops here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.

Read the full of A Fairy Song

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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