William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''There's nothing ill can dwell in such a temple.
    If the ill spirit have so fair a house,
    Good things will strive to dwell with 't.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Miranda, in The Tempest, act 1, sc. 2, l. 458-60. Her first impression of Ferdinand.
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  • ''Olivia. There lies your way, due west.
    Viola. Then westward ho!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Olivia and Viola, in Twelfth Night, act 3, sc. 1, l. 134. Viola picks up on the cry of watermen who ferried people across the Thames to Westminster.
  • ''Excellent wretch! Perdition catch my soul
    But I do love thee! and when I love thee not,
    Chaos is come again.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 3, sc. 3, l. 90-2. Desdemona has just left the stage; "wretch" was used as a term of endearment.
  • ''He is not very tall—yet for his years he's tall.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Phebe, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 5, l. 118. Fondly describing Rosalind, who is disguised as a young man.
  • ''Me of my lawful pleasure she restrained,
    And prayed me oft forbearance; did it with
    A pudency so rosy the sweet view on't
    Might well have warmed old Saturn; that I thought her
    As chaste as unsunned snow.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Posthumus, in Cymbeline, act 2, sc. 5, l. 9-13. Speaking of Imogen, when he believes, falsely, that she has been unfaithful; "pudency" means modesty. Saturn was one of the ancient gods, father of Jupiter.
  • ''Then to Silvia let us sing
    That Silvia is excelling.
    She excels each mortal thing
    Upon the dull earth dwelling.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Proteus, in The Two Gentlemen of Verona, act 4, sc. 2. Proteus, singing outside Silvia's chamber, was attempting to woo her ostensibly on behalf of Thurio, actually for himself. This is the third and last verse of one of the most famous of Shakespeare's songs, set to music by, among others, Schubert.
  • ''Bondage is hoarse and may not speak aloud,
    Else would I tear the cave where Echo lies
    And make her airy tongue more hoarse than mine
    With repetition of "My Romeo!"''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Romeo and Juliet (II, ii). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''From Rumor's tongues
    They bring smooth comforts false, worse than true wrongs.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rumor, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 1, sc. 1, l. 39-40.
  • ''"My daughter! O my ducats! O my daughter!
    Fled with a Christian! O my Christian ducats!
    Justice! the law! my ducats, and my daughter!"''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Solanio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 8, l. 15-7. Mockingly imitating Shylock's outcry on finding his daughter has stolen away with bags of ducats.
  • ''There be some sports are painful, and their labor
    Delight in them sets off. Some kinds of baseness
    Are nobly undergone, and most poor matters
    Point to rich ends.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. The Tempest (III, i). OAEL-1. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxxvii

Thy glass will show thee how thy beauties wear,
Thy dial how thy precious minutes waste;
The vacant leaves thy mind's imprint will bear,
And of this book this learning mayst thou taste.
The wrinkles which thy glass will truly show
Of mouthed graves will give thee memory;
Thou by thy dial's shady stealth mayst know
Time's thievish progress to eternity.
Look, what thy memory can not contain

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