William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Injurious Time now, with a robber's haste,
    Crams his rich thievery up, he knows not how;
    As many farewells as be stars in heaven,
    With distinct breath and consigned kisses to them,
    He fumbles up into a loose adieu,
    And scants us with a single famished kiss,
    Distasted with the salt of broken tears.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Troilus, in Troilus and Cressida, act 4, sc. 4, l. 42-8. On parting from Cressida; "he knows not how" = indiscriminately; numberless farewells, each with its kisses, are crammed into a casual ("loose") parting.
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  • ''Albany. Well, you may fear too far.
    Goneril. Safer than trust too far.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Albany and Goneril, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 4, l. 328-9.
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  • ''Since the torch is out,
    Lie down and stray no further.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 4, sc. 14, l. 46-7. The "torch" is the light of his life, Cleopatra.
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  • ''Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more,
    Men were deceivers ever,
    One foot in sea and one on shore,
    To one thing constant never:
    Then sigh not so, but let them go,
    And be you blithe and bonny,
    Converting all your sounds of woe
    Into Hey nonny, nonny.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Balthasar, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 3, l. 62-9. One of Shakespeare's best-known songs.
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  • ''Devils soonest tempt, resembling spirits of light.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Berowne, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 4, sc. 3, l. 253. Referring to the black-eyed Rosaline.
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  • ''I will not do thee so much wrong to wake thee.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 270. His servant Lucius has fallen asleep.
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  • ''She is
    The queen of curds and cream.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Camillo, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 4, l. 160-1. Seeing Perdita, really a princess, among the country shepherds and shepherdesses.
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  • ''A city on th' inconstant billows dancing;
    For so appears this fleet majestical.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Chorus, in Henry V, act 3, prologue, l. 15. Imagining the English fleet sailing to France.
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  • ''I was
    A morsel for a monarch.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 1, sc. 5, l. 30-1. Recalling her affair with Julius Caesar.
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  • ''They say all lovers swear more performance than they are able, and yet reserve an ability that they never perform; vowing more than the perfection of ten, and discharging less than the tenth part of one.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cressida, in Troilus and Cressida, act 3, sc. 2, l. 84-7. Showing her anxiety about the claims Troilus is making for love.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

A Fairy Song

Over hill, over dale,
Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire!
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moon's sphere;
And I serve the Fairy Queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green;
The cowslips tall her pensioners be;
In their gold coats spots you see;
Those be rubies, fairy favours;
In those freckles live their savours;
I must go seek some dewdrops here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.

Read the full of A Fairy Song

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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