William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Here's a fish hangs in the net like a poor man's right in the law; 'twill hardly come out.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 2nd Fisherman, in Pericles, act 2, sc. 1, l. 116-18.
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  • ''I know a wench of excellent discourse,
    Pretty and witty; wild, and yet, too, gentle.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antipholus of Ephesus, in The Comedy of Errors, act 3, sc. 1, l. 109-10.
  • ''This was the most unkindest cut of all;
    For when the noble Caesar saw him stab,
    Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms,
    Quite vanquished him.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2, l. 183-6. Pointing to the wound Brutus made.
  • ''There's not one wise man among twenty that will praise himself.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 5, sc. 2, l. 73-5. To Benedick, varying the proverb, "He must praise himself since no one else will."
  • ''To say the truth, reason and love keep little company together nowadays.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bottom, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 3, sc. 1, l. 143-4. Amazed that Titania makes love to him.
  • ''When holy and devout religious men
    Are at their beads, 'tis much to draw them thence,
    So sweet is zealous contemplation.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Buckingham, in Richard III, act 3, sc. 7, l. 92-4. "Beads" = rosary.
  • ''Cassius is aweary of the world:
    Hated by one he loves; braved by his brother;
    Checked like a bondman; all his faults observed,
    Set in a notebook, learned and conned by rote
    To cast into my teeth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 95-9. Inviting Brutus to stab him to death; "braved" means defied; "Checked" means rebuked; "conned by rote" means learned by heart.
  • ''But fare thee well, most foul, most fair! Farewell,
    Thou pure impiety and impious purity!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudio, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 1, l. 103-4. Dismissing Hero, whom he was to have married.
  • ''I love a ballad but even too well, if it be doleful matter merrily set down, or a very pleasant thing indeed, and sung lamentably.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Clown, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 4, l. 188-90. He likes a mixture of emotions in his ballads; "pleasant" means merry.
  • ''God keep your worship! I wish your worship well; God restore you to health! I humbly give you leave to depart; and if a merry meeting may be wished, God prohibit it!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Dogberry, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 5, sc. 1, l. 323-6. Dogberry presumably means to ask leave to depart, and for God to permit a merry meeting.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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