poet William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare

#6 on top 500 poets

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''I shall forget, to have thee still stand there,
    Remembering how I love thy company.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Romeo and Juliet (II, ii). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''Rumor is a pipe
    Blown by surmises, jealousies, conjectures.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rumor, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 1, sc. 1, l. 15-6. How rumor spreads, like music.
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  • ''I think he only loves the world for him.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Solanio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 8, l. 50. On Antonio's affection for Bassanio.
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  • ''Honor, riches, marriage blessing,
    Long continuance, and increasing,
    Hourly joys be still upon you!
    Juno sings her blessings on you.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. The Tempest (IV, i). OAEL-1. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''When that I was and a little tiny boy,
    With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,
    A foolish thing was but a toy,
    For the rain it raineth every day.

    But when I came to man's estate
    With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,
    'Gainst knaves and thieves men shut their gate,
    For the rain it raineth every day.

    But when I came, alas! to wive,
    With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,
    By swaggering could I never thrive,
    For the rain it raineth every day.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Twelfth Night (V, i). A sobering thought at the end of the comedy, as the play may seem a "foolish thing," or trifle ("toy"). The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''Striving to better, oft we mar what's well.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Albany, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 4.
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  • ''What hotter hours,
    Unregistered in vulgar fame, you have
    Luxuriously picked out.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 3, sc. 13, l. 118-20. Condemning Cleopatra for her past love affairs; "luxuriously" relates to lechery.
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  • ''Small cheer and great welcome makes a merry feast.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Balthazar, in The Comedy of Errors, act 3, sc. 1, l. 26. Proverbial.
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  • ''Light, seeking light, doth light of light beguile;
    So ere you find where light in darkness lies,
    Your light grows dark by losing of your eyes.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Berowne, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 1, sc. 1, l. 77-9. Arguing that as too much light dazzles and makes the eye unable to see, so too much study only confuses the student.
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  • ''If it be aught toward the general good,
    Set honor in one eye, and death i'th' other,
    And I will look on both indifferently;
    For let the gods so speed me as I love
    The name of honor more than I fear death.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 2, l. 85-9. Proclaiming his integrity.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,