William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Like to the Pontic Sea,
    Whose icy current and compulsive course
    Ne'er knows retiring ebb, but keeps due on
    To the Propontic and the Hellespont,
    Even so my bloody thoughts with violent pace
    Shall ne'er look back, ne'er ebb to humble love,
    Till that a capable and wide revenge
    Swallow them up.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 3, sc. 3, l. 453-60. The "Pontic Sea" is the Black Sea; the "Propontic" or Sea of Marmora, and the "Hellespont" the straits of the Dardanelles, connect the Black Sea with the Aegean Sea in the Mediterranean.
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  • ''Dead shepherd, now I find thy saw of might,
    "Who ever lov'd that lov'd not at first sight?"''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Phebe, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 5, l. 81-2. The quotation from Christopher Marlowe's poem Hero and Leander (1598), I.176 has passed into proverb lore. Marlowe died in 1593. Phebe, a shepherdess, calls Marlowe a shepherd.
  • ''Death makes no conquest of this conqueror,
    For now he lives in fame though not in life.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Edward, in Richard III, act 3, sc. 1, l. 87-8. Commenting on Julius Caesar.
  • ''A man that apprehends death no more dreadfully but as a drunken sleep, careless, reckless, and fearless of what's past, present, or to come; insensible of mortality, and desperately mortal.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Provost, in Measure for Measure, act 4, sc. 2, l. 142-5. On Barnadine, long since sentenced to die, and who has no fear of death, and no hope of escaping it ("desperately mortal").
  • ''It is nor hand, nor foot,
    Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part
    Belonging to a man. O, be some other name!
    What's in a name? That which we call a rose
    By any other word would smell as sweet;
    So Romeo would, were he not Romeo called,
    Retain that dear perfection which he owes
    Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name,
    And for thy name, which is no part of thee,
    Take all myself.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Romeo and Juliet (II, ii). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Enter Rumor, painted full of tongues.
    Open your ears; for which of you will stop
    The vent of hearing when loud Rumor speaks?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rumor, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 1, sc. 1, l. 1-2 and stage direction. The chorus to the play.
  • ''I owe him little duty and less love.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Somerset, in Henry VI, Part 1, act 4, sc. 4, l. 34.
  • ''But this rough magic
    I here abjure, and when I have required
    Some heavenly music—which even now I do—
    To work mine end upon their senses that
    This airy charm is for, I'll break my staff,
    Bury it certain fathoms in the earth,
    And deeper than did ever plummet sound
    I'll drown my book.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. The Tempest (V, i). OAEL-1. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Two loves I have of comfort and despair
    Which like two spirits do suggest me still;
    The better angel is a man right fair,
    The worser spirit a woman, colored ill.
    To win me soon to hell, my female evil
    Tempteth my better angel from my side,
    And would corrupt my saint to be a devil,
    Wooing his purity with her foul pride.
    And whether that my angel be turned fiend,
    Suspect I may, yet not directly tell;
    But being both from me; both to each friend,
    I guess one angel in another's hell.
    Yet this shall I ne'er know, but live in doubt,
    Till my bad angel fire my good one out.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Two loves I have of comfort and despair (l. 1-14). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Where I could not be honest,
    I never yet was valiant.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Albany, in King Lear, act 5, sc. 1, l. 24-5. He is unwilling to fight except in a good cause; "honest" means honorable.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxxvii

Thy glass will show thee how thy beauties wear,
Thy dial how thy precious minutes waste;
The vacant leaves thy mind's imprint will bear,
And of this book this learning mayst thou taste.
The wrinkles which thy glass will truly show
Of mouthed graves will give thee memory;
Thou by thy dial's shady stealth mayst know
Time's thievish progress to eternity.
Look, what thy memory can not contain

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