William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''These strong Egyptian fetters I must break,
    Or lose myself in dotage.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 1, sc. 2, l. 116-17. The fetters are those of his love for Cleopatra.
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  • ''If you can look into the seeds of time,
    And say which grain will grow and which will not,
    Speak then to me.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Banquo, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 3, l. 58-60. Speaking to the three witches.
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  • ''Love's feeling is more soft and sensible
    Than are the tender horns of cockled snails.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Berowne, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 4, sc. 3, l. 334-5. "Cockled" = possessing a shell.
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  • ''Let us be sacrificers, but not butchers, Caius.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 1, l. 166. On the idea of killing Caesar.
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  • ''They have seemed to be together, though absent; shook hands as over a vast; and embraced as it were from the ends of opposed winds.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Camillo, in The Winter's Tale, act 1, sc. 1, l. 29-31. Describing the long friendship of Leontes of Sicily and Polixenes of Bohemia.
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  • ''Thus with imagined wing our swift scene flies
    In motion of no less celerity
    Than that of thought.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Chorus, in Henry V, act 3, prologue, l. 1-3. "As swift as thought" was proverbial.
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  • ''I dreamt there was an Emperor Antony.
    O, such another sleep, that I might see
    But such another man!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 5, sc. 2, l. 76-8. After Antony's death.
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  • ''Time, force, and death
    Do to this body what extremes you can,
    But the strong base and building of my love
    Is as the very centre of the earth,
    Drawing all things to it.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cressida, in Troilus and Cressida, act 4, sc. 2, l. 101-5. On learning that she must leave Troilus and go to the Greek camp; the centre of the earth was thought to act as a powerful magnet.
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  • ''Ah, that deceit should steal such gentle shape,
    And with a virtuous visor hide deep vice!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duchess of York, in Richard III, act 2, sc. 2, l. 27-8. On Richard, who wears a mask ("visor") of virtue.
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  • ''He bids you ... to take mercy
    On the poor souls for whom this hungry war
    Opens his vasty jaws.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Exeter, in Henry V, act 2, sc. 4, l. 103-5. Henry's message to the King of France.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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