William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Come, thou monarch of the vine.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Song, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 2, sc. 7, l. 113. Song to Bacchus, god of wine.
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  • ''Double, double, toil and trouble
    Fire burn, and cauldron bubble.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. The three witches, in Macbeth, act 4, sc. 1, l. 10-11 (1623).
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  • ''The tyrannous and bloody deed is done,
    The most arch deed of piteous massacre
    That ever yet this land was guilty of.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Tyrell, in Richard III, act 4, sc. 3, l. 1-3. Lamenting the murder, ordered by Richard, of the two young princes in the Tower of London.
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  • ''Striving to better, oft we mar what's well.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Albany, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 4, l. 346. Varying the proverb, "let well alone."
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  • ''What our contempts doth often hurl from us,
    We wish it ours again.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 1, sc. 2, l. 123-4. Regret for what is scorned and thrown away.
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  • ''A heavy summons lies like lead upon me,
    And yet I would not sleep.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Banquo, in Macbeth, act 2, sc. 1, l. 6-7. Weariness summons him to sleep, but he is troubled in mind.
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  • ''At Christmas I no more desire a rose
    Than wish a snow in May's new-fangled shows,
    But like of each thing that in season grows.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Berowne, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 1, sc. 1, l. 105-7. Berowne rejects the idea of mature men devoting themselves to study.
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  • ''Th' abuse of greatness is when it disjoins
    Remorse from power.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 1. Contemplating the assassination of Caesar.
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  • ''I could do this, and that with no rash potion,
    But with a lingering dram, that should not work
    Maliciously, like poison.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Camillo, in The Winter's Tale, act 1, sc. 2, l. 319-21. On first hearing the king, Leontes, urge him to poison his "enemy," Polixenes.
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  • ''Piece out our imperfections with your thoughts.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Chorus, in Henry V, prologue, l. 23. "Piece out" means make good.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

O mistress mine, where are you roaming?
O stay and hear! your true-love's coming
That can sing both high and low;
Trip no further, pretty sweeting,
Journey's end in lovers' meeting-
Every wise man's son doth know.

What is love? 'tis not hereafter;
Present mirth hath present laughter;
What's to come is still unsure:
In delay there lies no plenty,-
Then come kiss me, Sweet and twenty,
Youth's a stuff will not endure.

Read the full of O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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