William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Katherina. Asses are made to bear, and so are you.
    Petruchio. Women are made to bear, and so are you.
    Katherina. No such jade as you, if me you mean.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Katherina and Petruchio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 2, sc. 1, l. 199-201. Playing on various senses of "bear," including bearing children; a jade is a worn-out horse, a hack.
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  • ''I would not lose so great an honor
    As one man more methinks would share with me
    For the best hope I have.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 4, sc. 3, l. 31-3. Rejecting Westmoreland's wish for a larger army to fight the French.
  • ''The ripest fruit first falls, and so doth he.
    His time is spent; our pilgrimage must be.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Richard, in Richard II, act 2, sc. 1, l. 153-4. Referring to the death of his uncle John of Gaunt; "pilgrimage" means journey through life.
  • ''Thou art a lady;
    If only to go warm were gorgeous,
    Why, nature needs not what thou gorgeous wear'st,
    Which scarcely keeps thee warm.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 2, sc. 4, l. 267-70. Speaking to his daughter Regan.
  • ''Grim death, how foul and loathsome is thine image.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lord, in The Taming of the Shrew, Induction, sc. 1, l. 35. The "image" is that of a drunken man.
  • ''I have no spur
    To prick the sides of my intent, but only
    Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself,
    And falls on th' other.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 7, l. 25-8. The image is of a rider vaulting into the saddle and falling on the other side of the horse; Macbeth is contemplating the murder of Duncan.
  • ''O, I have suffered
    With those that I saw suffer!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Miranda, in The Tempest, act 1, sc. 2, l. 5-6. She thinks she has seen a ship wrecked, and all the crew drowned.
  • ''Why, this is very midsummer madness.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Olivia, in Twelfth Night, act 3, sc. 4, l. 56. On Malvolio's strange behavior; the midsummer moon was thought to cause madness (or "lunacy," from "luna" means moon).
  • ''She was false as water.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 5, sc. 2, l. 134. Proverbial; "false" means unstable, unreliable.
  • ''[Antony] is become the bellows and the fan
    To cool a gipsy's lust.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Philo, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 1, sc. 1, l. 9-10. One acerbic view of the love of Antony and Cleopatra.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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