William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''I will be deaf to pleading and excuses.
    Nor tears nor prayers shall purchase out abuses.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Escalus, in Romeo and Juliet, act 3, sc. 1. After Romeo's killing of Tybalt.
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  • ''Yonder shines Aurora's harbinger.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Puck, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 3, sc. 2, l. 380. The morning star, or Venus, precursor of dawn (Venus is also goddess of love, and here heralds the reconciliation of the lovers in the play).
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  • ''Romeo. Lady, by yonder blessed moon I vow,
    That tips with silver all these fruit tree tops—
    Juliet. O, swear not by the moon, th' inconstant moon,
    That monthly changes in her circled orb,
    Lest that thy love prove likewise variable.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Romeo and Juliet, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 107-11.
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  • ''The blunt monster with uncounted heads,
    The still-discordant wav'ring multitude.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rumor, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 1, sc. 1, l. 18-9.
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  • ''Who doth ambition shun,
    And loves to live i' th' sun,
    Seeking the food he eats,
    And pleased with what he gets,
    Come hither, come hither, come hither!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Song, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 5, l. 38-42. Second stanza of a song praising the pastoral life.
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  • ''Fair is foul, and foul is fair,
    Hover through the fog and filthy air.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. The three witches, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 1, l. 10-11 (1623). End of the play's opening exchange, emphasising the disruption of the natural order.
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  • ''One touch of nature makes the whole world kin,
    That all, with one consent, praise new-born gauds.
    And give to dust that is a little gilt
    More laud than gilt o'er dusted;
    The present eye praises the present object.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ulysses, in Troilus and Cressida, act 3, sc. 3, l. 175-180. "Laud" = praise; appealing to constant changes in fashion in an effort to persuade Achilles to return to the battlefield.
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  • ''Wisdom and goodness to the vile seem vile.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Albany, in King Lear, act 4, sc. 2, l. 38.
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  • ''I will be
    A bridegroom in my death, and run into't
    As to a lover's bed.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 4, sc. 14, l. 99-101. Turning suicide into a fantasy of marriage.
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  • ''Were such things here as we do speak about,
    Or have we eaten on the insane root
    That takes the reason prisoner?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Banquo, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 3, l. 81-3 (1623). Addressing Macbeth, referring to the Witches which have just vanished.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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