William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''The raven chides blackness.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ulysses, in Troilus and Cressida, act 2, sc. 3, l. 211. Proverbial; on Ajax criticizing Achilles for his pride.
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  • ''Great thing of us forgot!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Albany, in King Lear, act 5, sc. 3, l. 237. In the excitement of other events, he has forgotten to find out what has happened to Lear and Cordelia.
  • ''What, girl, though grey
    Do something mingle with our younger brown, yet ha' we
    A brain that nourishes our nerves, and can
    Get goal for goal of youth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 4, sc. 8, l. 19-22. To Cleopatra, claiming he can match the young in fighting.
  • ''Oftentimes, to win us to our harm,
    The instruments of darkness tell us truths,
    Win us with honest trifles, to betray's
    In deepest consequence.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Banquo, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 3, l. 123-6. The witches are the "instruments of darkness," or agents of evil; "in deepest consequence" means in matters of greatest importance.
  • ''Taffeta phrases, silken terms precise,
    Three-piled hyperboles, spruce affectation,
    Figures pedantical—these summer flies
    Have blown me full of maggot ostentation.
    I do forswear them, and I here protest,
    By this white glove (How white the hand, God knows!),
    Henceforth my wooing mind shall be expressed
    In russet yeas and honest kersey noes.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Berowne, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 5, sc. 2, l. 406-13. "Russet" and "kersey" were plain and rough kinds of cloth.
  • ''The eye sees not itself
    But by reflection.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 2, l. 52-3.
  • ''I cannot draw a cart, nor eat dried oats;
    If it be man's work, I'll do't.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Captain, in King Lear, act 5, sc. 3, l. 38-9. Accepting a commission to kill Lear and Cordelia.
  • ''A little touch of Harry in the night.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Chorus, in Henry V, act 4, l. 47 (1600). Referring to Henry's eve-of-battle tour of his army's camp, rallying his men: "The royal captain of this ruined band/Walking from watch to watch, from tent to tent,/... /That every wretch, pining and pale before,/Beholding him, plucks comfort from his looks."
  • ''Celerity is never more admired
    Than by the negligent.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 3, sc. 7, l. 24-5. "A good rebuke," as Antony remarks (l. 25).
  • ''Never was a war did cease
    (Ere bloody hands were wash'd) with such a peace.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cymbeline, in Cymbeline, act 5, sc. 5, l. 484-5. Having the victory, Cymbeline nonetheless submits to the Romans.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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