William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Romeo. Courage, man, the hurt cannot be much.
    Mercutio. No, 'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door, but 'tis enough, 'twill serve. Ask for me tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Romeo and Mercutio, in Romeo and Juliet, act 3, sc. 1, l. 95-8. Even as he is dying, stabbed by Tybalt, Mercutio jests with a pun on the word "grave."
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  • ''O, call back yesterday, bid time return.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Salisbury, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 2, l. 65 (1597).
  • ''In sweet music is such art,
    Killing care and grief of heart
    Fall asleep, or hearing die.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Song, in Henry VIII, act 3, sc. 1, l. 12-14.
  • ''It is required
    You do awake your faith.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. The Winter's Tale (V, iii). OBSC. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Let us, like merchants, show our foulest wares,
    And think perchance they'll sell; if not,
    The lustre of the better yet to show
    Shall show the better.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ulysses, in Troilus and Cressida, act 1, sc. 3, l. 358-61. Plotting with Nestor to ensure that Ajax, not Achilles, meets Hector's challenge.
  • ''I am a humble suitor to your virtues;
    For pity is the virtue of the law,
    And none but tyrants use it cruelly.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Alcibiades, in Timon of Athens, act 3, sc. 5, l. 7-9. Begging the senators of Athens for the life of a friend who has killed a man in a duel.
  • ''I must from this enchanting queen break off.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 1, sc. 2, l. 128. Recalling his responsibilities; "queen" puns on "quean," or whore.
  • ''What, can the devil speak true?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Banquo, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 3, l. 107. On one of the witches' prophecies being fulfilled; varying the proverb, "the devil sometimes speaks the truth."
  • ''When love speaks, the voice of all the gods
    Make heaven drowsy with the harmony.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Berowne, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 4, sc. 3, l. 341-2. As if the gods sing in response to human love.
  • ''I will not hold thee long. If I do live,
    I will be good to thee.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 265-6. Asking his servant Lucius to play music.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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