William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Romeo. Courage, man, the hurt cannot be much.
    Mercutio. No, 'tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door, but 'tis enough, 'twill serve. Ask for me tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Romeo and Mercutio, in Romeo and Juliet, act 3, sc. 1, l. 95-8. Even as he is dying, stabbed by Tybalt, Mercutio jests with a pun on the word "grave."
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  • ''O, call back yesterday, bid time return.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Salisbury, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 2, l. 65 (1597).
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  • ''In sweet music is such art,
    Killing care and grief of heart
    Fall asleep, or hearing die.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Song, in Henry VIII, act 3, sc. 1, l. 12-14.
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  • ''It is required
    You do awake your faith.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. The Winter's Tale (V, iii). OBSC. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''Let us, like merchants, show our foulest wares,
    And think perchance they'll sell; if not,
    The lustre of the better yet to show
    Shall show the better.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ulysses, in Troilus and Cressida, act 1, sc. 3, l. 358-61. Plotting with Nestor to ensure that Ajax, not Achilles, meets Hector's challenge.
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  • ''I am a humble suitor to your virtues;
    For pity is the virtue of the law,
    And none but tyrants use it cruelly.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Alcibiades, in Timon of Athens, act 3, sc. 5, l. 7-9. Begging the senators of Athens for the life of a friend who has killed a man in a duel.
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  • ''I must from this enchanting queen break off.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 1, sc. 2, l. 128. Recalling his responsibilities; "queen" puns on "quean," or whore.
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  • ''What, can the devil speak true?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Banquo, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 3, l. 107. On one of the witches' prophecies being fulfilled; varying the proverb, "the devil sometimes speaks the truth."
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  • ''When love speaks, the voice of all the gods
    Make heaven drowsy with the harmony.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Berowne, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 4, sc. 3, l. 341-2. As if the gods sing in response to human love.
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  • ''I will not hold thee long. If I do live,
    I will be good to thee.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 265-6. Asking his servant Lucius to play music.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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