William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Better a witty fool than a foolish wit.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Feste, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 5, l. 36. Feste is a witty professional fool; "wit" means understanding or intelligence.
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  • ''A peevish self-willed harlotry,
    One that no persuasion can do good upon.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Glendower, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 1, l. 196-7. Speaking playfully of his daughter, who says she will not be parted from her husband, who is leaving for the wars; "harlotry" means hussy.
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  • ''Give me that man
    That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him
    In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart,
    As I do thee.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 2, l. 71-4. Praising Horatio.
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  • ''I think there's never a man in Christendom
    Can lesser hide his love or hate than he,
    For by his face straight shall you know his heart.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hastings, in Richard III, act 3, sc. 4, l. 51-3. Showing his mistaken trust in Richard.
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  • ''Be he as he will, yet once ere night
    I will embrace him with a soldier's arm
    That he shall shrink under my courtesy.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hotspur, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 5, sc. 2, l. 72-4. Promising to fight with Prince Hal.
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  • '''Tis her breathing that
    Perfumes the chamber thus.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jachimo, in Cymbeline, act 2, sc. 2, l. 18-9. Looking at Imogen asleep.
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  • ''Kent. This is nothing, Fool.
    Fool. The 'tis like the breath of an unfeed lawyer, you gave me nothing for't.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Kent and Fool, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 4, l. 128-30. Kent comments on the Fool's rhymes.
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  • ''Our bad neighbor makes us early stirrers,
    Which is both healthful and good husbandry.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 4, sc. 1, l. 6-7. "Husbandry" means management or thrift.
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  • ''What comfort have we now?
    By heaven, I'll hate him everlastingly
    That bids me be of comfort any more.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Richard, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 2, l. 206-8. Rejecting comfort in favor of despair.
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  • ''You do me wrong to take me out o' th' grave:
    Thou art a soul in bliss, but I am bound
    Upon a wheel of fire, that mine own tears
    Do scald like molten lead.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 4, sc. 7, l. 44-7. Lear thinks he is in hell; in classical and Christian mythology a wheel of fire was a traditional form of torture for the damned.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

A Fairy Song

Over hill, over dale,
Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire!
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moon's sphere;
And I serve the Fairy Queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green;
The cowslips tall her pensioners be;
In their gold coats spots you see;
Those be rubies, fairy favours;
In those freckles live their savours;
I must go seek some dewdrops here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.

Read the full of A Fairy Song

Sonnet Lxxvii

Thy glass will show thee how thy beauties wear,
Thy dial how thy precious minutes waste;
The vacant leaves thy mind's imprint will bear,
And of this book this learning mayst thou taste.
The wrinkles which thy glass will truly show
Of mouthed graves will give thee memory;
Thou by thy dial's shady stealth mayst know
Time's thievish progress to eternity.
Look, what thy memory can not contain

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