William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Better a witty fool than a foolish wit.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Feste, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 5, l. 36. Feste is a witty professional fool; "wit" means understanding or intelligence.
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  • ''A peevish self-willed harlotry,
    One that no persuasion can do good upon.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Glendower, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 1, l. 196-7. Speaking playfully of his daughter, who says she will not be parted from her husband, who is leaving for the wars; "harlotry" means hussy.
  • ''Give me that man
    That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him
    In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart,
    As I do thee.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 2, l. 71-4. Praising Horatio.
  • ''I think there's never a man in Christendom
    Can lesser hide his love or hate than he,
    For by his face straight shall you know his heart.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hastings, in Richard III, act 3, sc. 4, l. 51-3. Showing his mistaken trust in Richard.
  • ''Be he as he will, yet once ere night
    I will embrace him with a soldier's arm
    That he shall shrink under my courtesy.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hotspur, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 5, sc. 2, l. 72-4. Promising to fight with Prince Hal.
  • '''Tis her breathing that
    Perfumes the chamber thus.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jachimo, in Cymbeline, act 2, sc. 2, l. 18-9. Looking at Imogen asleep.
  • ''Kent. This is nothing, Fool.
    Fool. The 'tis like the breath of an unfeed lawyer, you gave me nothing for't.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Kent and Fool, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 4, l. 128-30. Kent comments on the Fool's rhymes.
  • ''Our bad neighbor makes us early stirrers,
    Which is both healthful and good husbandry.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 4, sc. 1, l. 6-7. "Husbandry" means management or thrift.
  • ''What comfort have we now?
    By heaven, I'll hate him everlastingly
    That bids me be of comfort any more.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Richard, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 2, l. 206-8. Rejecting comfort in favor of despair.
  • ''You do me wrong to take me out o' th' grave:
    Thou art a soul in bliss, but I am bound
    Upon a wheel of fire, that mine own tears
    Do scald like molten lead.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 4, sc. 7, l. 44-7. Lear thinks he is in hell; in classical and Christian mythology a wheel of fire was a traditional form of torture for the damned.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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