William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Kent. You have that in your countenance which I would fain call master.
    Lear. What's that?
    Kent. Authority.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Kent and Lear, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 4, l. 27-30.
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  • ''Old men forget; yet all shall be forgot,
    But he'll remember, with advantages,
    What feats he did that day.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 4, sc. 3, l. 49-51.
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  • ''Once more, adieu. The rest let sorrow say.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Richard, in Richard II, act 5, sc. 1, l. 102. Bidding farewell to his Queen as they are separated.
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  • ''Here I stand your slave,
    A poor, infirm, weak, and despised old man.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 3, sc. 2, l. 20. He is at the mercy of the elements, cast out in a storm.
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  • ''Beshrew me but I love her heartily,
    For she is wise, if I can judge of her,
    And fair she is, if that mine eyes be true,
    And true she is, as she hath proved herself;
    And therefore, like herself, wise, fair, and true,
    Shall she be placed in my constant soul.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lorenzo, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 6, l. 52-7. On his love for Jessica.
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  • ''At first
    And last, the hearty welcome.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 3, sc. 4, l. 1-2. "At first/And last" means once and for all.
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  • ''He hath eaten me out of house and home, he hath put all my
    substance into that fat belly of his.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Mistress Quickly, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 2, sc. 1, l. 74-5. On Falstaff's gargantuan appetite.
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  • ''O! never say that I was false of heart,
    Though absence seemed my flame to qualify.
    As easy might I from myself depart
    As from my soul, which in thy breast doth lie:
    That is my home of love; if I have ranged,
    Like him that travels, I return again,
    Just to the time, not with the time exchanged,
    So that myself bring water for my stain.
    Never believe, though in my nature reigned
    All frailties that besiege all kinds of blood,
    That it could so preposterously be stained,
    To leave for nothing all thy sum of good;
    For nothing this wide universe I call,
    Save thou, my rose; in it thou art my all.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. O! Never say that I was false of heart (l. 1-14). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''If that the earth could teem with woman's tears,
    Each drop she falls would prove a crocodile.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 4, sc. 1, l. 245-6. Accusing Desdemona of deception; crocodiles proverbially shed hypocritical tears over their victims.
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  • ''All hell shall stir for this.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Pistol, in Henry V, act 5, sc. 1, l. 68. On being forced by Fluellen to eat a leek.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

A Fairy Song

Over hill, over dale,
Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire!
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moon's sphere;
And I serve the Fairy Queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green;
The cowslips tall her pensioners be;
In their gold coats spots you see;
Those be rubies, fairy favours;
In those freckles live their savours;
I must go seek some dewdrops here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.

Read the full of A Fairy Song

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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