William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Rosalind. Well, this is the forest of Arden.
    Touchstone. Ay, now am I in Arden, the more fool I.
    When I was at home, I was in a better place, but travellers must be content.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind and Touchstone, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 4, l. 15-18.
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  • ''Well then, it now appears you need my help.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Shylock, in The Merchant of Venice, act 1, sc. 3, l. 114. To Antonio, who has reviled him.
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  • ''Sweet recreation barred, what doth ensue
    But moody and dull melancholy,
    Kinsman to grim and comfortless despair.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. The Abbess, in The Comedy of Errors, act 5, sc. 1, l. 78-80. Showing Adriana the state to which she has supposedly driven her husband.
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  • ''Come and take choice of all my library,
    And so beguile thy sorrow.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Titus, in Titus Andronicus, act 4, sc. 1, l. 34-5. To Lavinia, who has no hands to cope with books.
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  • ''In such business
    Action is eloquence, and the eyes of th' ignorant
    More learned than the ears.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Volumnia, in Coriolanus, act 3, sc. 2, l. 75-7. Coriolanus's mother advises him to look humble in front of the Roman people in order to win votes.
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  • ''Thou hast the sweetest face I ever looked on.
    Sir, as I have a soul, she is an angel.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 2nd Gentleman, in Henry VIII, act 4, sc. 1, l. 43. On seeing Anne Bullen, now crowned as Queen.
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  • ''Along with them
    They brought one Pinch, a hungry lean-faced villain,
    A mere anatomy, a mountebank,
    A threadbare juggler and a fortune-teller,
    A needy, hollow-eyed, sharp looking wretch,
    A living dead man.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antipholus of Ephesus, in The Comedy of Errors, act 5, sc. 1, l. 237-42. Doctor Pinch, a schoolmaster and charlatan ("mountebank"), called in by Adriana to help restore Antipholus when she supposed her husband was mad; "anatomy" means skeleton.
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  • ''O judgment, thou art fled to brutish beasts,
    And men have lost their reason!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2, l. 104-5. Otherwise, he implies, they would all mourn for Caesar.
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  • ''I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow than a man swear he loves me.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 1, sc. 1, l. 131-2.
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  • ''I will aggravate my voice so that I will roar you as gently as any sucking dove. I will roar you and 'twere any nightingale.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bottom, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 1, sc. 2, l. 81-4. Bottom offers the gentlest of lion's roars so as not to frighten ladies; he means to say "moderate."
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

O mistress mine, where are you roaming?
O stay and hear! your true-love's coming
That can sing both high and low;
Trip no further, pretty sweeting,
Journey's end in lovers' meeting-
Every wise man's son doth know.

What is love? 'tis not hereafter;
Present mirth hath present laughter;
What's to come is still unsure:
In delay there lies no plenty,-
Then come kiss me, Sweet and twenty,
Youth's a stuff will not endure.

Read the full of O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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