William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''All so soon as the all-cheering sun
    Should in the farthest east begin to draw
    The shady curtains from Aurora's bed.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Montague, in Romeo and Juliet, act 1, sc. 1, l. 134-6.
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  • ''I shall th'effect of this good lesson keep
    As watchman to my heart.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ophelia, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 3. In response to the lengthy advice given her by her brother Polonius before his departure for France.
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  • ''Had it pleased heaven
    To try me with affliction, had they rained
    All kind of sores and shames on my bare head,
    Steeped me in poverty to the very lips,
    Given to captivity me and my utmost hopes,
    I should have found in some place of my soul
    A drop of patience.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 4, sc. 2, l. 47-53.
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  • ''I am qualmish at the smell of leek.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Pistol, in Henry V, act 5, sc. 1, l. 21. He is insulting Fluellen, who wears a leek to identify himself as Welsh (usually worn on St. David's Day, delebrating the patron saint of Wales).
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  • ''His valors shown upon our crests today
    Have taught us how to cherish such high deeds
    Even in the bosom of our adversaries.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Hal, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 5, sc. 4, l. 29-31. Freeing the prisoner Douglas, who has fought heroically.
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  • ''The screech-owl, screeching loud,
    Puts the wretch that lies in woe
    In remembrance of a shroud.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Puck, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 5, sc. 1, l. 376-8. The owl was regarded as a bird of ill omen, often foreboding death.
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  • ''O mischief, thou art swift
    To enter in the thoughts of desperate men!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Romeo, in Romeo and Juliet, act 5, sc. 1.
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  • ''Sebastian. He is drunk now. Where had he wine?
    Alonzo. And Trinculo is reeling ripe. Where should they
    Find this grand liquor that hath gilded 'em?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sebastian and Alonzo, in The Tempest, act 5, sc. 1, l. 278-9. On the arrival of the drunken butler Stephano and his companion Trinculo; "gilded" means flushed, made them red-faced.
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  • ''For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright,
    Who art as black as hell, as dark as night.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sonnet 151 (1609).
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  • ''"I hate" from hate away she threw,
    And saved my life, saying "not you."''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Those lips that love's own hand did make (l. 13-14). Son. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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