William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''With all the gracious utterance thou hast
    Speak to his gentle hearing kind commends.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Richard, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 3, l. 125-6. Flattering Henry Bolingbroke, who has control of the kingdom.
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  • ''Mend your speech a little,
    Lest you may mar your fortunes.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 1, l. 94-5. On Cordelia refusing to say she loves him.
  • ''There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st
    But in his motion like an angel sings,
    Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubins;
    Such harmony is in immortal souls,
    But whilst this muddy vesture of decay
    Doth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lorenzo, in The Merchant of Venice, act 5, sc. 1, l. 60-5. It was thought that the soul, liberated from the body ("vesture of decay"), might hear the music made by the stars in their motions; cherubim were covered with eyes, according to Ezekiel 10:12.
  • ''For Banquo's issue have I filed my mind;
    For them the gracious Duncan have I murdered;
    Put rancors in the vessel of my peace
    Only for them; and mine eternal jewel
    Given to the common enemy of man,
    To make them kings, the seeds of Banquo kings!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 3, sc. 1, l. 64-9. He has defiled ("filed") his mind, filled the cup of his peace with enmity, and given his soul ("eternal jewel") to the devil; "seeds" means descendants.
  • ''I have served him, and the man commands
    Like a full soldier.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Montano, in Othello, act 2, sc. 1, l. 35-6. Referring to Othello.
  • ''Tomorrow is Saint Valentine's day,
    All in the morning betime,
    And I a maid at your window,
    To be your Valentine.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ophelia, in Hamlet, act 4, sc. 5, l. 48-51. Singing in her madness after her father's death.
  • ''Soft you, a word or two before you go.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 5, sc. 2, l. 338. "Soft you" means hold on, wait a moment.
  • ''A soldier firm and sound of heart.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Pistol, in Henry V, act 3, sc. 6, l. 25. Praising Bardolph, who is to be hanged for stealing from a church.
  • ''I am the king of courtesy ... a Corinthian, a lad of mettle, a good boy.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Hal, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 4, l. 12. Terms of approval given to him by the bartenders of a tavern; Corinthians were noted as spendthrifts and profligates.
  • ''Queen. And must we be divided? Must we part?
    King Richard. Ay, hand from hand, my love, and heart from heart.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Queen and King Richard, in Richard II, act 5, sc. 1, l. 81-2. Richard is being sent north to imprisonment.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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