poet William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare

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William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Sad hours seem long.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Romeo, in Romeo and Juliet, act 1, sc. 1, l. 161. The lovelorn Romeo finds time hangs on his hands.
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  • ''Look, he's winding up the watch of his wit; by and by it will strike.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sebastian, in The Tempest, act 2, sc. 1, l. 12-3. Scornfully referring to Gonzalo, who is trying to comfort Alonso; "wit" means intelligence or thought.
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  • ''Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
    Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
    Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
    And summer's lease hath all too short a date.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sonnet 18 (1609).
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  • ''when a woman woos, what woman's son
    Will sourly leave her till she have prevailed?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Those petty wrongs that liberty commits (l. 7-8). InvP. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''Take but degree away, untune that string,
    And hark what discord follows!
    ...
    Force should be right, or, rather, right and wrong—
    Between whose endless jar justice resides—
    Should lose their names, and so should justice too.
    Then everything includes itself in power,
    Power into will, will into appetite;
    And appetite, an universal wolf,
    So doubly seconded with will and power,
    Must make perforce an universal prey,
    And last eat up himself.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ulysses, in Troilus and Cressida, act 1, sc. 3, l. 109-10, 116-24. Ulysses' vision of anarchy if social ranks and hierarchy are done away with.
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  • ''Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie,
    Which we ascribe to heaven. The fated sky
    Gives us free scope, only doth backward pull
    Our slow designs when we ourselves are dull.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. All's Well That Ends Well (I, i). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''His life was gentle, and the elements
    So mixed in him that nature might stand up
    And say to all the world "This was a man."''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 5, sc. 5, l. 72-4 (1623). Referring to Brutus. Antony bases the end of his panegyric on the Platonic notion that the four natural elements (earth, air, fire and water) are represented in man.
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  • ''What are these,
    So withered, and so wild in their attire,
    That look not like th' inhabitants o'th' earth,
    And yet are on't?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Banquo, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 3. Referring to the three witches.
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  • ''Study is like the heaven's glorious sun,
    That will not be deep searched with saucy looks;
    Small have continual plodders ever won,
    Save base authority from others' books.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Berowne, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 1, sc. 1, l. 84-7. "Small" = little; "base" = second-hand, hackneyed.
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  • ''Be angry when you will, it shall have scope.
    Do what you will, dishonor shall be humor.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 108-9. To Cassius, patching their quarrel by giving his anger free rein ("scope"), and humoring his questionable conduct.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Lxxvii

Thy glass will show thee how thy beauties wear,
Thy dial how thy precious minutes waste;
The vacant leaves thy mind's imprint will bear,
And of this book this learning mayst thou taste.
The wrinkles which thy glass will truly show
Of mouthed graves will give thee memory;
Thou by thy dial's shady stealth mayst know
Time's thievish progress to eternity.
Look, what thy memory can not contain