William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Greatness knows itself.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hotspur, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 4, sc. 3, l. 74. Implying that great men take power for granted.
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  • ''The flame o' th' taper
    Bows toward her, and would under-peep her lids,
    To see th' enclosed lights, now canopied
    Under these windows, white and azure laced
    With blue of heaven's own tinct.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jachimo, in Cymbeline, act 2, sc. 2, l. 19-23. Looking at Imogen asleep.
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  • ''Kill thy physician, and the fee bestow
    Upon the foul disease.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Kent, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 1, l. 163-4. Kent himself is the "physician" trying to cure Lear of madness.
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  • ''In peace there's nothing so becomes a man
    As modest stillness and humility.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 3, sc. 1, l. 3-4.
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  • ''Pride must have a fall.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Richard, in Richard II, act 5, sc. 5, l. 88. Proverbial.
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  • ''Mend when thou canst, be better at thy leisure.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 2, sc. 4, l. 229. Speaking to his daughter Goneril; "mend" means improve.
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  • ''Who comes so fast in silence of the night?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lorenzo, in The Merchant of Venice, act 5, sc. 1, l. 25. Hearing the sound of a messenger.
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  • ''I have lived long enough: my way of life
    Is fallen into the sere, the yellow leaf;
    And that which should accompany old age,
    As honor, love, obedience, troops of friends,
    I must not look to have.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 5, sc. 3, l. 22-6. "Sere" means dry and withered; "As honor" means such as honor.
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  • ''Advantage is a better soldier than rashness.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Montjoy, in Henry V, act 3, sc. 6, l. 120. Better to wait for a favorable opportunity than act rashly in war; so the French king makes the best of losing Harfleur to the English.
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  • ''How should I your true-love know
    From another one?
    By his cockle hat and staff,
    And his sandal shoon.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ophelia, in Hamlet, act 4, sc. 5, l. 23-6. Singing old songs in her madness after her father's death; "cockle hat" means hat bearing a cockle-shell, the sign, with the sandals, of a pilgrim; "shoon" means shoes.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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