William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''This fellow's of exceeding honesty,
    And knows all qualities, with a learnèd spirit,
    Of human dealings.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 3, sc. 3, l. 258-60. Trusting Iago as one who knows all types of characters ("qualities").
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  • ''Art thou officer,
    Or art thou base, common, and popular?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Pistol, in Henry V, act 4, sc. 1, l. 37-8. Addressing the King, who is disguised.
  • ''That trunk of humors, that bolting-hutch of beastliness, that
    swollen parcel of dropsies, that huge bombard of sack, that
    stuffed cloak-bag of guts, that roasted Manningtree ox with
    the pudding in his belly.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Hal, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 4, l. 449-53. Describing Falstaff; "bolting-hutch" means flour bin; "bombard" means leather wine vessel; "Manningtree" means a town in Essex.
  • ''An honest tale speeds best being plainly told.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Queen, Elizabeth in Richard III, act 4, sc. 4, l. 358. Proverbial; exposing Richard's hypocrisy.
  • ''She will not stay the siege of loving terms,
    Nor bide the encounter of assailing eyes,
    Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Romeo, in Romeo and Juliet, act 1, sc. 1, l. 212-4. Speaking of Rosaline, who rejects his advances.
  • ''Now I will believe
    That there are unicorns; that in Arabia
    There is one tree, the phoenix' throne, one phoenix
    At this hour reigning there.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sebastian, in The Tempest, act 3, sc. 3, l. 21-4. A strange vision has made him willing to believe any traveller's tale, of mythical unicorns or the phoenix, said to renew itself periodically from the ashes of its own pyre.
  • ''Summer's lease hath all too short a date.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sonnet 18.
  • ''I that please some, try all, both joy and terror
    Of good and bad, that makes and unfolds error.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Time, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 1, l. 1-4. Time, the chorus, proclaims his proverbial impartiality or indifference in relation to humanity ("time tries all things").
  • ''For beauty, wit,
    High birth, vigor of bone, desert in service,
    Love, friendship, charity, are subjects all
    To envious and calumniating time.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ulysses, in Troilus and Cressida, act 3, sc. 3, l. 171-4. Inviting Achilles to contemplate the brevity of life and all human attributes in an effort to get him to fight.
  • ''You cram these words into mine ears against
    The stomach of my sense.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Alonso, in The Tempest, act 2, sc. 1, l. 107-8. To Gonzalo, who has been trying to comfort him; he fears his son is drowned.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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