William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''This fellow's of exceeding honesty,
    And knows all qualities, with a learnèd spirit,
    Of human dealings.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 3, sc. 3, l. 258-60. Trusting Iago as one who knows all types of characters ("qualities").
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  • ''Art thou officer,
    Or art thou base, common, and popular?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Pistol, in Henry V, act 4, sc. 1, l. 37-8. Addressing the King, who is disguised.
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  • ''That trunk of humors, that bolting-hutch of beastliness, that
    swollen parcel of dropsies, that huge bombard of sack, that
    stuffed cloak-bag of guts, that roasted Manningtree ox with
    the pudding in his belly.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Hal, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 4, l. 449-53. Describing Falstaff; "bolting-hutch" means flour bin; "bombard" means leather wine vessel; "Manningtree" means a town in Essex.
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  • ''An honest tale speeds best being plainly told.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Queen, Elizabeth in Richard III, act 4, sc. 4, l. 358. Proverbial; exposing Richard's hypocrisy.
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  • ''She will not stay the siege of loving terms,
    Nor bide the encounter of assailing eyes,
    Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Romeo, in Romeo and Juliet, act 1, sc. 1, l. 212-4. Speaking of Rosaline, who rejects his advances.
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  • ''Now I will believe
    That there are unicorns; that in Arabia
    There is one tree, the phoenix' throne, one phoenix
    At this hour reigning there.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sebastian, in The Tempest, act 3, sc. 3, l. 21-4. A strange vision has made him willing to believe any traveller's tale, of mythical unicorns or the phoenix, said to renew itself periodically from the ashes of its own pyre.
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  • ''Summer's lease hath all too short a date.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sonnet 18.
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  • ''I that please some, try all, both joy and terror
    Of good and bad, that makes and unfolds error.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Time, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 1, l. 1-4. Time, the chorus, proclaims his proverbial impartiality or indifference in relation to humanity ("time tries all things").
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  • ''For beauty, wit,
    High birth, vigor of bone, desert in service,
    Love, friendship, charity, are subjects all
    To envious and calumniating time.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ulysses, in Troilus and Cressida, act 3, sc. 3, l. 171-4. Inviting Achilles to contemplate the brevity of life and all human attributes in an effort to get him to fight.
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  • ''You cram these words into mine ears against
    The stomach of my sense.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Alonso, in The Tempest, act 2, sc. 1, l. 107-8. To Gonzalo, who has been trying to comfort him; he fears his son is drowned.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

A Fairy Song

Over hill, over dale,
Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire!
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moon's sphere;
And I serve the Fairy Queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green;
The cowslips tall her pensioners be;
In their gold coats spots you see;
Those be rubies, fairy favours;
In those freckles live their savours;
I must go seek some dewdrops here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.

Read the full of A Fairy Song

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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