William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''When that the poor hath cried, Caesar hath wept.
    Ambition should be made of sterner stuff.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2, l. 92-3 (1623). In Brutus's address to the people, after the assassination of Caesar, he had said of Caesar: "As he was ambitious, I slew him." Mark Antony's oration aims to turn the crowd's sympathies and he plays on Brutus's accusation of Caesar's ambition.
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  • ''Be thou armed for some unhappy words.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Baptista, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 2, sc. 1, l. 139. Advising Petruchio what to expect from Katherine.
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  • ''A lover's eyes will gaze an eagle blind.
    A lover's ear will hear the lowest sound.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Berowne, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 4, sc. 3, l. 331-2. In a speech in praise of love.
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  • ''He is given
    To sports, to wildness, and much company.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 1, l. 188-9. Describing Mark Antony.
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  • ''It is so very late that we
    May call it early by and by. Good night.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Capulet, in Romeo and Juliet, act 3, sc. 4, l. 34-5. Dismissing Paris, who has been waiting in hopes of seeing Juliet.
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  • ''Mean and gentle all
    Behold, as may unworthiness define,
    A little touch of Harry in the night.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Chorus, in Henry V, act 4, prologue, l. 45-7. High and low ("mean and gentle") alike are influenced by the King's personality (the familiar "Harry," not Henry); the Chorus apologizes for his "unworthiness" in attempting to describe it.
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  • ''Give me some music; music, moody food
    Of us that trade in love.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 2, sc. 5, l. 1-2.
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  • ''Let me work;
    For I can give his humor the true bent.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Decius, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 1, l. 209-10. Claiming he can direct Caesar's inclination the right way.
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  • ''The hand that hath made you fair hath made you good.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duke, in Measure for Measure, act 3, sc. 1, l. 180-1. Greeting the novice Isabella; the hand is God's...
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  • ''Either I mistake your shape and making quite,
    Or else you are that shrewd and knavish sprite
    Called Robin Goodfellow.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Fairy, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 2, sc. 1, l. 32-4. Robin is better known as Puck, the mischievous ("shrewd") servant of Oberon, King of the Fairies.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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