William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''When that the poor hath cried, Caesar hath wept.
    Ambition should be made of sterner stuff.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2, l. 92-3 (1623). In Brutus's address to the people, after the assassination of Caesar, he had said of Caesar: "As he was ambitious, I slew him." Mark Antony's oration aims to turn the crowd's sympathies and he plays on Brutus's accusation of Caesar's ambition.
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  • ''Be thou armed for some unhappy words.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Baptista, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 2, sc. 1, l. 139. Advising Petruchio what to expect from Katherine.
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  • ''A lover's eyes will gaze an eagle blind.
    A lover's ear will hear the lowest sound.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Berowne, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 4, sc. 3, l. 331-2. In a speech in praise of love.
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  • ''He is given
    To sports, to wildness, and much company.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 1, l. 188-9. Describing Mark Antony.
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  • ''It is so very late that we
    May call it early by and by. Good night.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Capulet, in Romeo and Juliet, act 3, sc. 4, l. 34-5. Dismissing Paris, who has been waiting in hopes of seeing Juliet.
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  • ''Mean and gentle all
    Behold, as may unworthiness define,
    A little touch of Harry in the night.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Chorus, in Henry V, act 4, prologue, l. 45-7. High and low ("mean and gentle") alike are influenced by the King's personality (the familiar "Harry," not Henry); the Chorus apologizes for his "unworthiness" in attempting to describe it.
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  • ''Give me some music; music, moody food
    Of us that trade in love.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 2, sc. 5, l. 1-2.
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  • ''Let me work;
    For I can give his humor the true bent.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Decius, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 1, l. 209-10. Claiming he can direct Caesar's inclination the right way.
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  • ''The hand that hath made you fair hath made you good.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duke, in Measure for Measure, act 3, sc. 1, l. 180-1. Greeting the novice Isabella; the hand is God's...
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  • ''Either I mistake your shape and making quite,
    Or else you are that shrewd and knavish sprite
    Called Robin Goodfellow.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Fairy, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 2, sc. 1, l. 32-4. Robin is better known as Puck, the mischievous ("shrewd") servant of Oberon, King of the Fairies.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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