William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''I say there is no darkness but ignorance.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Feste, in Twelfth Night, act 4, sc. 2, l. 42-3. Pretending to be a priest, Sir Topas, he preaches to the imprisoned Malvolio.
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  • ''All the courses of my life do show
    I am not in the roll of common men.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Glendower, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 1, l. 41-2. Boasting of his greatness.
  • ''The rest is silence.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 5, sc. 2, l. 358. Hamlet's last words.
  • ''There is a law in each well-ordered nation
    To curb those raging appetites that are
    Most disobedient and refractory.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hector, in Troilus and Cressida, act 2, sc. 2, l. 180-2. "Refractory" = wilful, stubborn.
  • ''By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap
    To pluck bright honor from the pale-faced moon,
    Or dive into the bottom of the deep,
    Where fathom-line could never touch the ground,
    And pluck up drowned honor by the locks.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hotspur, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 1, sc. 3, l. 201-5. For Hotspur, "honor" means fame or glory gained in battle; "locks" means hair.
  • ''Was ever feather so lightly blown to and fro as this multitude?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jack Cade, in Henry VI, Part 2, act 4, sc. 8, l. 55-6.
  • ''Thou whoreson zed, thou unnecessary letter!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Kent, in King Lear, act 2, sc. 2, l. 64.
  • ''Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 3, sc. 1, l. 1. Henry's famous battle cry at the gap or breach in the walls of Harfleur.
  • ''Is not the king's name twenty thousand names?
    Arm, arm, my name! A puny subject strikes
    At thy great glory.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Richard, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 2, l. 85-7. Having no soldiers, he tries to cheer himself up.
  • ''Of all these bounds, even from this line to this,
    With shadowy forests and with champains riched,
    With plenteous rivers and wide-skirted meads,
    We make thee lady.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 1, l. 63-6. Giving his daughter Goneril a third of the kingdom; "champains" means open country; "meads" means meadows.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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