William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sonnet 18, "Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer's Day?"
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Life's uncertain voyage.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Timon, in Timon of Athens, act 5, sc. 1, l. 202.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Take the instant way,
    For honor travels in a strait so narrow,
    Where one but goes abreast. Keep then the path,
    For emulation hath a thousand sons
    That one by one pursue. If you give way,
    Or hedge aside from the direct forthright,
    Like to an entered tide, they all rush by
    And leave you hindmost.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ulysses, in Troilus and Cressida, act 3, sc. 3, l. 153-60. Depicting life as a rat-race to Achilles in an effort to get him to fight again.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Alonso. What harmony is this? My good friends, hark!
    Gonzalo. Marvelous sweet music!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Alonzo and Gonzalo, in The Tempest, act 3, sc. 3, l. 18-9. Hearing "solemn and strange" music, according to the stage direction.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Live a thousand years,
    I shall not find myself so apt to die.
    No place will please me so, no mean of death,
    As here by Caesar, and by you cut off,
    The choice and master spirits of this age.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 1, l. 159-63. To Brutus and the conspirators who assassinated Caesar.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''A soldier is better accommodated than with a wife.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bardolph, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 3, sc. 2, l. 66-7. Referring to Falstaff who is provided ("accommodated") with Doll Tearsheet as a companion.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''War is no strife
    To the dark house and the detested wife.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bertram, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 2, sc. 3, l. 291-2. Preferring the risks of war to being at home.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth,
    Action, nor utterance, nor the power of speech
    To stir men's blood; I only speak right on.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2, l. 221-3. He has already stirred the people in speaking about the killing of Caesar.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Had I but served my God with half the zeal
    I served my King, He would not in mine age
    Have left me naked to mine enemies.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cardinal Wolsey, in Henry VIII, act 3, sc. 2. These words, spoken in the play to Thomas Cromwell, were in fact recorded as Wolsey's dying words in Raphael Holinshed, Chronicles (1577), one of Shakespeare's main sources, where they appear in the form: "If I had served God as diligently as I have done the King, He would not have given me over in my grey hairs."
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''For who is he, whose chin is but enriched
    With one appearing hair, that will not follow
    These culled and choice-drawn cavaliers to France?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Chorus, in Henry V, act 3, prologue, l. 22-4. On the English army sailing to France; "choice-drawn" means carefully chosen.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

[Report Error]