William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''It is my birthday,
    I had thought t' have held it poor; but since my lord
    Is Antony again, I will be Cleopatra.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 3, sc. 13, l. 184-6. After her reconciliation with Antony.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''To her, my lord,
    Was I betrothed ere I saw Hermia;
    But like a sickness did I loathe this food.
    But, as in health come to my natural taste,
    Now I do wish it, love it, long for it,
    And will for evermore be true to it.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Demetrius, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 4, sc. 1, l. 171-6. Professing his eternal loyalty to Helena.
  • ''Thy best of rest is sleep,
    And that thou oft provok'st, yet grossly fear'st
    Thy death, which is no more.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duke, in Measure for Measure, act 3, sc. 1, l. 17-9. Disguised as a Friar, he is preparing Claudio to face death.
  • ''Falstaff. I am old, I am old.
    Doll Tearsheet. I love thee better than I love e'er a scurvy
    young boy of them all.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff and Doll Tearsheet, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 2, sc. 4, l. 271-3. Scurvy means contemptible; a term of abuse.
  • ''Many a good hanging prevents a bad marriage.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Feste, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 5, l. 18 (1623).
  • ''There will be a world of water shed
    Upon the parting of your wives and you.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Glendower, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 1, l. 93-4. He is to bring the rebels' wives to take leave before the wars.
  • ''For who would bare the whips and scorns of time,
    Th'oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,
    The pangs of disprized love, the law's delay,
    The insolence of office, and the spurns
    That patient merit of th'unworthy takes,
    When he himself might his quietus make
    With a bare bodkin?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 1, l. 72-78 (1604). part of Hamlet's meditative soliloquy on the question of "To be, or not to be."
  • ''Life every man holds dear, but the dear man
    Holds honor far more precious-dear than life.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hector, in Troilus and Cressida, act 5, sc. 3, l. 25-8. Refusing to be dissuaded from fighting by pressure from his wife Andromache and Cassandra; "dear man" = man of worth, noble man.
  • ''I can teach thee, coz, to shame the devil
    By telling truth: tell truth and shame the devil.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hotspur, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 1, l. 57-8. To Glendower ("coz" means cousin), who has been claiming supernatural powers; "tell truth and shame the devil" was proverbial (as the devil was the father of lies).
  • ''Adam was a gardener.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jack Cade, in Henry VI, Part 2, act 4, sc. 2, l. 134. A peasant claiming all men are descended from a working man, though Adam did not have to work in the Garden of Eden.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

[Report Error]