William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''The heavens themselves, the planets, and this centre
    Observe degree, priority, and place.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ulysses, in Troilus and Cressida, act 1, sc. 3, l. 85-6. Appealing to a hierarchical concept of the universe, with the earth at the center, as in the Ptolemaic concept of astronomy.
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  • ''If we shadows have offended,
    Think but this, and all is mended,
    That you have but slumbered here
    While these visions did appear.
    And this weak and idle theme,
    No more yielding but a dream,''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. A Midsummer Night's Dream (V, i). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''O, what a fall was there, my countrymen!
    Then I, and you, and all of us fell down,
    Whilst bloody treason flourished over us.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2, l. 190-2. On the death of Caesar.
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  • ''You that choose not by the view,
    Chance as fair, and choose as true:
    Since this fortune falls to you,
    Be content, and seek no new.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bassanio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 2, l. 131-4. The message he finds in the leaden casket telling him he has won Portia.
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  • ''either by thy picture or my love,
    Thyself away art present still with me;
    For thou not farther than my thoughts canst move,
    And I am still with them, and they with thee;
    Or, if they sleep, thy picture in my sight
    Awakes my heart to heart's and eye's delight.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Betwixt mine eye and heart a league is took (l. 9-14). EyDe. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''Remember March, the Ides of March remember.
    Did not great Julius bleed for justice' sake?
    What villain touched his body, that did stab
    And not for justice?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 18-21.
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  • ''O how wretched
    Is that poor man that hangs on princes' favours!
    There is betwixt that smile we would aspire to,
    That sweet aspect of princes, and their ruin,
    More pangs and fears than wars or women have,
    And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer,
    Never to hope again.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cardinal Wolsey, in Henry VIII, act 3, sc. 2.
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  • ''The mirror of all Christian kings.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Chorus, in Henry V, act 2, prologue, l. 6. Praising Henry V as the model for all kings.
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  • ''Shall I abide
    In this dull world, which in thy absence is
    No better than a sty?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 4, sc. 15, l. 60-2. On the death of Antony.
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  • ''Nay, I'll go with thee, cheek by jowl.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Demetrius, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 3, sc. 2, l. 338. Going off to fight with Lysander.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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