William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''The heavens themselves, the planets, and this centre
    Observe degree, priority, and place.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ulysses, in Troilus and Cressida, act 1, sc. 3, l. 85-6. Appealing to a hierarchical concept of the universe, with the earth at the center, as in the Ptolemaic concept of astronomy.
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  • ''If we shadows have offended,
    Think but this, and all is mended,
    That you have but slumbered here
    While these visions did appear.
    And this weak and idle theme,
    No more yielding but a dream,''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. A Midsummer Night's Dream (V, i). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''O, what a fall was there, my countrymen!
    Then I, and you, and all of us fell down,
    Whilst bloody treason flourished over us.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2, l. 190-2. On the death of Caesar.
  • ''You that choose not by the view,
    Chance as fair, and choose as true:
    Since this fortune falls to you,
    Be content, and seek no new.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bassanio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 2, l. 131-4. The message he finds in the leaden casket telling him he has won Portia.
  • ''either by thy picture or my love,
    Thyself away art present still with me;
    For thou not farther than my thoughts canst move,
    And I am still with them, and they with thee;
    Or, if they sleep, thy picture in my sight
    Awakes my heart to heart's and eye's delight.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Betwixt mine eye and heart a league is took (l. 9-14). EyDe. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Remember March, the Ides of March remember.
    Did not great Julius bleed for justice' sake?
    What villain touched his body, that did stab
    And not for justice?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 18-21.
  • ''O how wretched
    Is that poor man that hangs on princes' favours!
    There is betwixt that smile we would aspire to,
    That sweet aspect of princes, and their ruin,
    More pangs and fears than wars or women have,
    And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer,
    Never to hope again.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cardinal Wolsey, in Henry VIII, act 3, sc. 2.
  • ''The mirror of all Christian kings.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Chorus, in Henry V, act 2, prologue, l. 6. Praising Henry V as the model for all kings.
  • ''Shall I abide
    In this dull world, which in thy absence is
    No better than a sty?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 4, sc. 15, l. 60-2. On the death of Antony.
  • ''Nay, I'll go with thee, cheek by jowl.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Demetrius, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 3, sc. 2, l. 338. Going off to fight with Lysander.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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