William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Hermia. Good night, sweet friend;
    Thy love ne'er alter till thy sweet life end!
    Lysander. Amen, amen, to that fair prayer say I,
    And then end life when I end loyalty!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hermia and Lysander, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 2, sc. 2, l. 60-3.
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  • ''If Cassio do remain,
    He hath a daily beauty in his life
    That makes me ugly.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Iago, in Othello, act 5, sc. 1, l. 18-9. Meaning "if Cassio remains alive."
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  • ''Here comes a pair of very strange beasts, which in all
    tongues are called fools.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jaques, in As You Like It, act 5, sc. 4, l. 36-8. Referring to Touchstone and Audrey.
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  • ''God knows, my son,
    By what by-paths and indirect crooked ways
    I met this crown.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, sc. 5, l. 183-5. On the devious means by which he came to power.
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  • ''O, heinous, strong, and bold conspiracy!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Richard II, act 5, sc. 3, l. 59. On learning of a plot to murder him; "heinous" means abominable.
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  • ''Come, you spirits
    That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,
    And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full
    Of direst cruelty. Make thick my blood,
    Stop up th'access and passage to remorse,
    That no compunctious visitings of nature
    Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between
    Th'effect and it. Come to my woman's breasts,
    And take my milk for gall, you murd'ring ministers,
    Wherever in your sightless substances
    You wait on nature's mischief.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lady Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 5, l. 39-49 (1623). Summoning evil spirits that attend on murderous ("mortal") thoughts.
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  • ''I prithee, daughter, do not make me mad.
    I will not trouble thee, my child; farewell:
    We'll no more meet, no more see one another.
    But yet thou art my flesh, my blood, my daughter—
    Or rather a disease that's in my flesh,
    Which I must needs call mine.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 2, sc. 4, l. 218-23.
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  • ''To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
    Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
    To the last syllable of recorded time,
    And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
    The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
    Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player
    That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
    And then is heard no more: it is a tale
    Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
    Signifying nothing.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Macbeth (V, v). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon 'em.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Malvolio, in Twelfth Night, act 2, sc. 5. Quoting Maria's letter.
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  • ''No more be grieved at that which thou hast done,
    Roses have thorns, and silver fountains mud,
    Clouds and eclipses stain both moon and sun,
    And loathsome canker lives in sweetest bud.
    All men make faults, and even I in this,
    Authorizing thy trespass with compare,
    My self corrupting salving thy amiss,
    Excusing thy sins more than thy sins are:''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. No more be grieved at that which thou hast done (l. 1-8). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

O mistress mine, where are you roaming?
O stay and hear! your true-love's coming
That can sing both high and low;
Trip no further, pretty sweeting,
Journey's end in lovers' meeting-
Every wise man's son doth know.

What is love? 'tis not hereafter;
Present mirth hath present laughter;
What's to come is still unsure:
In delay there lies no plenty,-
Then come kiss me, Sweet and twenty,
Youth's a stuff will not endure.

Read the full of O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;