William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Little of this great world can I speak
    More than pertains to feats of broils and battle,
    And therefore little shall I grace my cause
    In speaking for myself.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 1, sc. 3, l. 86-9. "Broils" means quarrels or fights.
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  • ''The great man down, you mark his favorite flies,
    The poor advanced makes friends of enemies.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Player King, in Hamlet, act 4, sc. 7, l. 141-6.
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  • ''Falstaff sweats to death,
    And lards the lean earth as he walks along.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Hal, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 2, l. 108-9. "Lards" means covers in grease.
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  • ''What sport shall we devise here in this garden
    To drive away the heavy thought of care?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Queen, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 4, l. 1-2. Speaking to the women who attend on her.
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  • ''It is my lady, O, it is my love.
    O that she knew she were!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Romeo, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 10-1. Seeing Juliet at her window.
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  • ''I can no other answer make but thanks,
    And thanks.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sebastian, in Twelfth Night, act 3, sc. 3, l. 14-5. Thanking his friend Antonio.
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  • ''For precious friends hid in death's dateless night.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. "Sonnet 30."
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  • ''I weigh my friend's affection with mine own.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Timon, in Timon of Athens, act 1, sc. 2, l. 216. Assuming his friends are like himself.
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  • ''Time hath, my lord, a wallet at his back,
    Wherein he puts alms for oblivion,
    A great-sized monster of ingratitudes:
    Those scraps are good deeds past, which are devoured
    As fast as they are made, forgot as soon
    As done.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ulysses, in Troilus and Cressida, act 3, sc. 3, l. 145-50. Trying to persuade the idle Achilles to fight again for the Greeks; Time was often personified as an old man.
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  • ''Now the hungry lion roars,
    And the wolf behowls the moon;
    Whilst the heavy ploughman snores,
    All with weary task fordone.
    Now the wasted brands do glow,
    Whilst the screech-owl, screeching loud,
    Puts the wretch that lies in woe
    In remembrance of a shroud.
    Now it is the time of night,
    That the graves, all gaping wide,
    Every one lets forth his sprite,
    In the church-way paths to glide:''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. A Midsummer Night's Dream (V, i). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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