William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''I am no orator, as Brutus is,
    But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man
    That love my friend, and that they know full well
    That gave me public leave to speak of him.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2, l. 217-20. Antony is, of course, much the better orator in speaking of Caesar.
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  • ''Pardon this fault, and by my soul I swear
    I never more will break an oath with thee.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bassanio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 5, sc. 1, l. 247-8. The "fault" lay in giving Portia's ring away.
  • ''Old fashions please me best.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bianca, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 3, sc. 1, l. 80.
  • ''The deep of night is crept upon our talk,
    And nature must obey necessity.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 226-7. To Cassius, suggesting they sleep.
  • ''Who ever knew the heavens menace so?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Casca, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 3, l. 44. On the night before the assassination of Caesar.
  • ''Now entertain conjecture of a time
    When creeping murmur and the poring dark
    Fills the wide vessel of the universe.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Chorus, in Henry V, act 4, prologue, l. 1-3. The dark is "poring" because people strain to see.
  • ''The quick comedians
    Extemporally will stage us, and present
    Our Alexandrian revels: Antony
    Shall be brought drunken forth, and I shall see
    Some squeaking Cleopatra boy my greatness
    I' th' posture of a whore.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 5, sc. 2, l. 216-21. A direct allusion to Shakespeare's own theater, in which female characters were played by boy-actors.
  • ''My love to Hermia,
    Melted as the snow, seems to me now
    As the remembrance of an idle gaud
    Which in my childhood I did dote upon.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Demetrius, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 4, sc. 1, l. 165-8. "Idle gaud" means worthless plaything.
  • ''The robbed that smiles steals something from the thief;
    He robs himself that spends a bootless grief.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duke, in Othello, act 1, sc. 3, l. 208-9. "Spends a bootless grief" means indulges in useless lamenting.
  • ''God keep lead out of me!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 5, sc. 3, l. 34. Referring to bullets.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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