William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''And thus the whirligig of time brings in his revenges.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Feste, in Twelfth Night, act 5, sc. 1, l. 372-3 (1623).
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  • ''Gloucester. Nor further, sir, a man may rot even here.
    Edgar. What, in ill thoughts again? Men must endure
    Their going hence, even as their coming hither;
    Ripeness is all.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gloucester and Edgar, in King Lear, act 5, sc. 2, l. 8-11. "Ripeness is all" may mean the gods determine when we die, or that we must await the time of ripeness when we are ready for death.
  • ''Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you,
    trippingly on the tongue; but if you mouth it as many of your
    players do, I had as lief the town-crier spoke my lines.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 2, l. 1-4. To the actors, who are to perform a play with a speech by Hamlet inserted.
  • ''Thus to persist
    In doing wrong extenuates not wrong,
    But makes it much more heavy.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hector, in Troilus and Cressida, act 2, sc. 2, l. 186-8. Seeing that the Trojans are wrong to want to keep Helen.
  • ''Now I perceive the devil understands Welsh.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hotspur, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 1, l. 229. Alluding to Glendower's claim to supernatural powers.
  • ''It will be proved to thy face that thou hast men about thee that usually talk of a noun and a verb and such abominable words as no Christian ear can endure to hear.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jack Cade, in Henry VI, Part 3, act 4, sc. 7, l. 37-40. An illiterate peasant accusing Lord Saye of treason.
  • ''I cannot wish the fault undone, the issue of it being so proper.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Kent, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 1, l. 60. On learning that the handsome ("proper") Edmund is the "issue" of Gloucester's adultery.
  • '''Tis ever common
    That men are merriest when they are from home.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 1, sc. 2, l. 271-2.
  • ''My grief lies all within,
    And these external manners of laments
    Are merely shadows to the unseen grief
    That swells with silence in the tortured soul.
    There lies the substance.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Richard, in Richard II, act 4, sc. 1, l. 295-9. Lamenting his fall; "manners" means shows or forms.
  • ''My wits begin to turn.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 3, sc. 2, l. 67. Realizing he is going mad.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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