William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''O sun,
    Burn the great sphere thou mov'st in! darkling stand
    The varying shore o' th' world!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 4, sc. 15, l. 9-11. Calling for universal darkness to mark the death of Antony.
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  • ''She is a woman, therefore may be wooed;
    She is a woman, therefore may be won.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Demetrius, in Titus Andronicus, act 2, sc. 1, l. 82-3. Proposing to woo Lavinia, Titus's daughter.
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  • ''To mourn a mischief that is past and gone
    Is the next way to draw new mischief on.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duke, in Othello, act 1, sc. 3, l. 204-5. "Mischief" means misfortune or calamity.
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  • ''That he is old, the more the pity, his white hairs do witness it.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 4, l. 467-8. Inviting sympathy because of old age.
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  • ''Journeys end in lovers meeting.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Feste's song, in Twelfth Night, act 2, sc. 3. To Sir Toby Belch and Sir Andrew Aguecheek.
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  • ''Gloucester. I hope they will not come upon us now.
    King Henry. We are in God's hands, brother, not in theirs.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gloucester and King Henry, in Henry V, act 3, sc. 6, l. 168-9. Henry soothes Gloucester's anxiety that the French might attack.
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  • ''There is something in this more than natural, if philosophy
    could find it out.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 367-8. Commenting on his uncle's popularity as king with the people who previously decried him.
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  • ''Value dwells not in particular will;
    It holds his estimate and dignity
    As well wherein 'tis precious of itself
    As in the prizer.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hector, in Troilus and Cressida, act 2, sc. 2, l. 53-7. Arguing that value depends on intrinsic worth, not on the particular preference of any individual; the debate is about keeping Helen or returning her to the Greeks.
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  • ''But thoughts, the slaves of life, and life, time's fool,
    And time, that takes survey of all the world,
    Must have a stop.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hotspur, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 5, sc. 4, l. 81-3. Spoken as he dies, killed in battle by Prince Hal; thought is dependent on life, and life on time.
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  • ''Jaques. Have you a song, forester, for this purpose?
    2nd Lord. Yes, sir.
    Jaques. Sing it. 'Tis no matter how it be in tune, so it
    make noise enough.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jaques and 2nd Lord, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 2, l. 5-9. The song is to celebrate the killing of a deer.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,