William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''I will die a hundred thousand deaths
    Ere break the smallest parcel of this vow.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Hal, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 2, l. 158-9. Vowing his allegiance to his father and determination to overcome their enemy, Hotspur.
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  • ''Methinks
    Some unborn sorrow, ripe in fortune's womb,
    Is coming towards me, and my inward soul
    With nothing trembles.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Queen, in Richard II, act 2, sc. 2, l. 9-12. Anticipating the fall of Richard.
  • ''Here's much to do with hate, but more with love.
    Why then, O brawling love, O loving hate,
    O anything of nothing first create,
    O heavy lightness, serious vanity,
    Misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Romeo, in Romeo and Juliet, act 1, sc. 1, l. 176-9. On the miseries of unrequited love, hinting too at the Capulet-Montague quarrel; "create" means created.
  • ''Faith, there hath been many great men that have flattered the people who ne'er loved them.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Second Officer, in Coriolanus, act 2, sc. 2, l. 7-8 (1623).
  • ''Art made tongue-tied by authority.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sonnet 66.
  • ''All's oblique;
    There's nothing level in our cursed natures
    But direct villainy. Therefore be abhorred
    All feasts, societies, and throngs of men!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Timon, in Timon of Athens, act 4, sc. 3, l. 18-21. "Obliquy" may be an error for obliquity, or deviation from moral standards.
  • ''Blunt wedges rive hard knots.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ulysses, in Troilus and Cressida, act 1, sc. 3, l. 316. Proverbial; he has in mind getting the proud Achilles to return to the battlefield.
  • ''Amiens. My voice is ragged, I know I cannot please you.
    Jaques. I do not desire you to please me, I do desire you
    to sing.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Amiens and Jaques, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 5, l. 15-8.
  • ''Let each man render me his bloody hand.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 1, l. 184. Shaking hands with the murderers of Caesar, and seeming to make peace with them.
  • ''In religion,
    What damned error but some sober brow
    Will bless it, and approve it with a text,
    Hiding the grossness with fair ornament?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bassanio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 2, l. 77-80. "Approve" means confirm.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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