William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''I will die a hundred thousand deaths
    Ere break the smallest parcel of this vow.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Hal, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 2, l. 158-9. Vowing his allegiance to his father and determination to overcome their enemy, Hotspur.
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  • ''Methinks
    Some unborn sorrow, ripe in fortune's womb,
    Is coming towards me, and my inward soul
    With nothing trembles.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Queen, in Richard II, act 2, sc. 2, l. 9-12. Anticipating the fall of Richard.
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  • ''Here's much to do with hate, but more with love.
    Why then, O brawling love, O loving hate,
    O anything of nothing first create,
    O heavy lightness, serious vanity,
    Misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Romeo, in Romeo and Juliet, act 1, sc. 1, l. 176-9. On the miseries of unrequited love, hinting too at the Capulet-Montague quarrel; "create" means created.
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  • ''Faith, there hath been many great men that have flattered the people who ne'er loved them.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Second Officer, in Coriolanus, act 2, sc. 2, l. 7-8 (1623).
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  • ''Art made tongue-tied by authority.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sonnet 66.
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  • ''All's oblique;
    There's nothing level in our cursed natures
    But direct villainy. Therefore be abhorred
    All feasts, societies, and throngs of men!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Timon, in Timon of Athens, act 4, sc. 3, l. 18-21. "Obliquy" may be an error for obliquity, or deviation from moral standards.
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  • ''Blunt wedges rive hard knots.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ulysses, in Troilus and Cressida, act 1, sc. 3, l. 316. Proverbial; he has in mind getting the proud Achilles to return to the battlefield.
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  • ''Amiens. My voice is ragged, I know I cannot please you.
    Jaques. I do not desire you to please me, I do desire you
    to sing.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Amiens and Jaques, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 5, l. 15-8.
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  • ''Let each man render me his bloody hand.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 1, l. 184. Shaking hands with the murderers of Caesar, and seeming to make peace with them.
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  • ''In religion,
    What damned error but some sober brow
    Will bless it, and approve it with a text,
    Hiding the grossness with fair ornament?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bassanio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 2, l. 77-80. "Approve" means confirm.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

A Fairy Song

Over hill, over dale,
Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire!
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moon's sphere;
And I serve the Fairy Queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green;
The cowslips tall her pensioners be;
In their gold coats spots you see;
Those be rubies, fairy favours;
In those freckles live their savours;
I must go seek some dewdrops here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.

Read the full of A Fairy Song

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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