William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Our peace shall stand as firm as rocky mountains.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Mowbray, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, sc. 1, l. 186. A rebel hopes to negotiate peace with the King.
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  • ''The glass of fashion and the mould of form,
    Th'observed of all observers.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ophelia, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 1, l. 153-4. Seeing Hamlet as a mirror (glass) by which fashion is measured, and a pattern (mould) of the perfect courtier.
  • ''She's gone. I am abused, and my relief
    Must be to loathe her.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 3, sc. 3.
  • ''O that this blossom could be kept from cankers!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Poins, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 2, sc. 2, l. 94-5. Referring to Falstaff's boy; cankers means corruption, from canker-worms that eat into blossoms.
  • ''I did not think thee lord of such a spirit.
    Before, I loved thee as a brother, John,
    But now I do respect thee as my soul.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Hal, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 5, sc. 4, l. 18-20. Praising his brother's courage.
  • ''Haply a woman's voice may do some good
    When articles too nicely urged be stood on.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Queen Isabel, in Henry V, act 5, sc. 2, l. 93-4. "Haply" means perhaps; she hopes to mediate if too much fuss is made about details of an agreement ("stood on" means insisted on).
  • ''Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Romeo, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 186. To Juliet as she goes in from her window.
  • ''We have here recovered the most dangerous piece of lechery that ever was known in the commonwealth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Second Watchman, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 3, l. 167-8. The comic watchman means to say "discovered" and "treachery."
  • ''Thus is his cheek the map of days outworn.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sonnet 68.
  • ''There's none
    Can truly say he gives if he receives.
    If our betters play at that game, we must not dare
    To imitate them; faults that are rich are fair.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Timon, in Timon of Athens, act 1, sc. 2, l. 10-13. The "fault" is to expect something in return for a gift.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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