William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Thou art come to answer
    A stony adversary, an inhuman wretch,
    Uncapable of pity, void and empty
    From any dram of mercy.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duke, in The Merchant of Venice, act 4, sc. 1, l. 3-6. To Antonio, about Shylock; "answer" means defend yourself; "dram" means minute amount.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Do thou amend thy face, and I'll amend my life.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 3, l. 24-5. To Bardolph, whose nose is inflamed with drinking.
  • ''1st Guard. Is this well done?
    Charmian. It is well done, and fitting for a princess
    Descended of so many royal kings.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. First guard and Charmian, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 5, sc. 2, l. 325-7. Caesar's guards find Cleopatra dead.
  • ''Gloucester. Is't not the King?
    Lear. Ay, every inch a king!
    When I do stare, see how the subject quakes!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gloucester and Lear, in King Lear, act 4, sc. 6, l. 107.
  • ''Lay not that flattering unction to your soul,
    That not your trespass but my madness speaks;
    It will but skin and film the ulcerous place,
    Whilst rank corruption, mining all within,
    Infects unseen.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 4, l. 147-9. To Gertrude, who thinks he is mad; "flattering unction" means soothing ointment of flattery.
  • ''But now he's gone, and my idolatrous fancy
    Must sanctify his relics.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Helena, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 1, sc. 1, l. 97-8. Love ("fancy") turns into quasi-religious worship.
  • ''I had rather hear a brazen canstick turned,
    Or a dry wheel grate on the axle-tree,
    And that would set my teeth nothing on edge,
    Nothing so much as mincing poetry.
    'Tis like the forced gait of a shuffling nag.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hotspur, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 1, l. 129-33. Hotspur, speaking in verse, dismisses poetry as affected or effeminate ("mincing"); "canstick" means candlestick; "turned" means on a lathe.
  • ''Jaques. Let's meet as little as we can.
    Orlando. I do desire we may be better strangers.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jaques and Orlando, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 2, l. 257-8.
  • ''Fortune, good night; smile once more, turn thy wheel.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Kent, in King Lear, act 2, sc. 2, l. 173. Recalling the proverbs, "Fortune's wheel is ever turning," and "Fortune can both smile and frown."
  • ''Will you vouchsafe to teach a soldier terms
    Such as will enter at a lady's ear
    And plead his love-suit to her gentle heart?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 5, sc. 2, l. 99-101. Having defeated the French, Henry tries to make love to Katherine, daughter of the French king.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

[Report Error]